100 suggestions for: What to do … what to do … this weekend

November 20th, 2014

Out & About Ohio November 2014

Brooklyn – Hooley House!
21st – Big in Japan, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Jukebox Heroes, 28th – Brigid’s Cross, 29th – Breakfast Club. 10310 Cascade Crossing, Brooklyn. 216-362-7700. 1FunPub.com

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center
20th -Irish Pub Music Night. Tue & Thu: Irish language, music, dance classes. For genealogy sessions, call for appt. Book now for parties, meetings, classes, film screenings or events. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100. www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

The Harp
21st – Pitch the Peat, 22nd – Chris Allen, 26th – Chris & Tom, 28th – Kristine Jackson, 29th – The Porter Sharks. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com
Stone Mad
30th – Chris Allen. Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500
Flat Iron Café
21st – Chad Hoffman, 28th – Donal O’Shaughnessy. 1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216.696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com

20th - Ohio City Singers @Treehouse

20th – Ohio City Singers @Treehouse

Treehouse
20th – TURKEY JAM Ohio City Singers 8:00 pm; 23rd – Jeff Sherman; 30th – Brent Kirby. 820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com

PJ McIntyre’s
21st – Whiskey Sinners, 22nd – Crazy Chester, 26th – THANKSGIVING EVE w/ Marys Lane, 27th – Happy Thanksgiving! Open @7pm, 28th – Hot Carl, 29th – Velvetshake.
Cavs and Browns Specials! Irish Language Classes Every Tuesday. Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. A Local 10 Union establishment / Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.

West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.

Kristine Jackson:  22nd – Flannerys, 28th – The Harp,

Kristine Jackson: 22nd – Flannerys, 28th – The Harp,

Flannery’s Pub
21st – Walking Cane, 22nd – Kristine Jackson, 28th & 29th- New Barleycorn, PLUS: Winterfest on East 4th Street – Ice sculptures, complimentary hot cider, tree lightings, carolers, crafts for kids & More. 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side
21st – Donegal Doggs. PUB: 7:30 – 10:30. IACES 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
Trad Sessiún 3rd Wednesday. 414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina
Sully’s
21st – Westside Steve, 22nd – Marys Lane, 26th – The Music Men, 28th – Smug Saints, 29th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 21st to 23rd – Medina’s 30th Annual Candlelight Walk. 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House
21st – Almost Famous, 22nd – Brigid’s Cross, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Samantha Fitzpatrick, 28th – School Girl Crush, 29th – Monica Robbins & the Ninja Cowboys. All starts @9:30. Every Tuesday – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Every Wednesday – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great live music and food in the Pub every Friday. 27th – Annual Mass and Raffle. 22nd – Monthly Steak Soot, 30th – Annual Trim-A-Tree Gathering. WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Westlake
Hooley House
21st – Cocktail Johnny, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Charlie in the Box, 28t – Matt Johnson’s Piano Fiasco, 29th – Brigid’s Cross. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. 
1FunPub.com
(440) 835-2890

Willoughby
Mullarkey’s
21st – Mo Andrews, 22nd – Mossy Moran, 28th – 107.09 Band, 29th – The Thrifters. Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Tara Hall
Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. No Cover. Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

 

100 suggestions for: What to do … what to do …

November 15th, 2014
November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

The Harp
15th – Fior Gael, 19th – Lonesome Stars, 21st – Pitch the Peat, 22nd – Chris Allen, 26th – Chris & Tom, 28th – Kristine Jackson, 29th – The Porter Sharks. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com
Stone Mad
16th – Heather Venesile Jazz Duo, 30th – Chris Allen. Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500
Flat Iron Café
21st – Chad Hoffman, 28th – Donal O’Shaughnessy. 1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216.696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com
Treehouse
16th -Pat Shepard; 20th – TURKEY
JAM Ohio City Singers 8:00 pm; 23rd – Jeff Sherman; 30th – Brent Kirby. 820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com

New Barleycorn at Pj McInytre's

New Barleycorn at Pj McInytre’s

PJ McIntyre’s
15th – New Barleycorn, 21st – Whiskey Sinners, 22nd – Crazy Chester, 26th – THANKSGIVING EVE w/ Marys Lane, 27th – Happy Thanksgiving! Open @7pm, 28th – Hot Carl, 29th – Velvetshake.
Cavs and Browns Specials! Irish Language Classes Every Tuesday. Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. A Local 10 Union establishment / Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.

West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.

Flannery’s Pub
15th – Brent Kirby, 21st – Walking Cane, 22nd – Kristine Jackson, 28th & 29th- New Barleycorn, PLUS: Winterfest on East 4th Street – Ice sculptures, complimentary hot cider, tree lightings, carolers, crafts for kids & More. 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***
Euclid
Irish American Club East Side
19th – Annual Lip Synch Show $8, 14th – Pop the Cork @ Club Dinner, 20th – Steak Shoot,21st – Donegal Doggs. PUB: 7:30 – 10:30. IACES 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
Trad Sessiún 3rd Wednesday. 414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina
Sully’s
15th – Mossy Moran, 21st – Westside Steve, 22nd – Marys Lane, 26th – The Music Men, 28th – Smug Saints, 29th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 21st to 23rd – Medina’s 30th Annual Candlelight Walk. 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House
15th – Abbey Rodeo, 21st – Almost Famous, 22nd – Brigid’s Cross, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Samantha Fitzpatrick, 28th – School Girl Crush, 29th – Monica Robbins & the Ninja Cowboys. All starts @9:30. Every Tuesday – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Every Wednesday – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great live music and food in the Pub every Friday. 9th – “25” Card Game, 27th Annual Mass and Raffle. 22nd _ Monthly Steak Soot, 30th – Annual Trim-A-Tree Gathering. WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Westlake
Hooley House
21st – Cocktail Johnny, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Charlie in the Box, 28t – Matt Johnson’s Piano Fiasco, 29th – Brigid’s Cross. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. 
1FunPub.com
(440) 835-2890

Willoughby
Mullarkey’s
115th – Dan McCoy, 21st – Mo Andrews, 22nd – Mossy Moran, 28th – 107.09 Band, 29th – The Thrifters. Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Tara Hall
Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. No Cover. Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Slainte

Slainte

A Story from this Month’s Issue of the Ohio Irish American News

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Coal Tattoo

November 8th, 2014

Coal Tattoo

Back in the 90s, I was working in a coal mine in Alabama. There had been an accident, and we were sent to find ways to get more coal, safer. Kids were the 3rd, 4th generation to go down. They were 16.

At 7 a.m., 20-30 men would enter the mine elevator, called the shaft. It went down 2,000 feet. We piled out, and 4 men got in a little rail car. Very like a roller coaster car, from not so long ago.

My right knee, then the guy across from me’s left knee, then my left knee, then his right, then the guy next to me’s right knee, etc. 4 to the car. We then jerked, rattled, bumped, shifted, rolled down the tracks, to the digging site.

It was then about 7:40 a.m. It got blacker as we rolled. Each man wore a hard hat, with a spotlight attached. We also carried “cardinals”, modeled after the auld days, when they actually did have a live cardinal. If the bird died, there was gas, run. Now, it is an electronic sensor. If it beeps, run.

Digging was in three prongs: the dig – a massive teeth grinding machine, bigger than a snow plow, that ate away at a tunnel; scooper then conveyed the loosened coal and rock back to a monster bed,like those old paper drive truck beds, that hauled it out; and then a safety crew, that shot massive ribar, capped with a large metal plate, into the walls and ceiling – THAT is what held it all from falling – when it didn’t fall.

If your light was off, you could not see your hand if front of your face. In many of the forks, water was ankle to knee high. You brought your lunch, and somehow, some, still brought their cigarettes.

At 2:10, men moved back to the rail car, and rattled back to the elevator shaft. On top around 3, they took turns into the showers. The eyeliner acquired never left. Ears, eyes, throat …

For a 16, 18 year old, the money was fantastic. A new pickup truck, an apartment at 18 or 19 … they turned 60, by their 40th birthday. The money was no longer fantastic. Because they worked in a coal mine, they were not eligible for health insurance. period.

In an ironic twist, I left that job, and returned to Cleveland, to accept a job with the American Cancer Society.  Tho I love the song Coal Tattoo, and sing it incesstantly, Paddy Reilly’s version of this song, Working Man, is also stuck in my head and my heart, ever since:

“Working Man”

T’is a working man I am
And I’ve been down underground
And I swear to God
If I ever see the sun

Oh for any length of time
I can hold it in my mind
I never again
Will go down underground

At the age of sixteen years
Oh he quarrels with his peers
He vowed they’d never
See another one

In the dark recess of the mine
Where you age before your time
And the coal dust lies heavy
On your lungs

It’s a working man I am
And I’ve been down underground
And I swear to God
If I ever see the sun

Oh for any length of time
I can hold it in my mind
I never again
Will go down underground

At the age of sixty four
He will greet you at the door
And he will gently lead you
By the arm

Through the dark recess of the mine
He will take you back in time
And he’ll tell you of
The hardships that were had

It’s a working man I am
And I’ve been down underground
And I swear to God
If I ever see the sun

Oh for any length of time
I can hold it in my mind
I never again will go down underground

What to do: what to do

November 8th, 2014

Out & About Ohio November 2014
from your Ohio Irish American News

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center
8th – 1950s Sock Hop; 20th -Irish Pub Music Night. Tue & Thu: Irish language, music, dance classes. For genealogy sessions, call for appt. Book now for parties, meetings, classes, film screenings or events. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100. www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

The Harp

8th – Chris Allen, 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com

Stone Mad
9th – Walking Cane, Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500

Treehouse
9th -Kristine Jackson 820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com
PJ McIntyre’s
8th – Charlie in the Box. Cavs and Browns Specials! Irish Language Classes Every Tuesday. Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. A Local 10 Union establishment / Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.
West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.
Flannery’s Pub
8th- Claire Stuczynski, 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side
8th – The Great Pretenders, PUB: 7:30 – 10:30. IACES 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
Trad Sessiún 3rd Wednesday. 414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina
Sully’s
8th – New Barleycorn, 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House
Every Tuesday – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Every Wednesday – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great live music and food in the Pub every Friday. 9th – “25” Card Game, 27th Annual Mass and Raffle.. WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Willoughby
Mullarkey’s
8th – Pat Shepard, Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Tara Hall
Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;

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Simponi is not simple ~ On Rheumatoid II

November 5th, 2014

Simponi ~  On Rheumatoid II
By John O’Brien, Jr.

My ex used to say, you’ve had RA for a long time, you should be used to the pain by now, and dismissively move on to her complaint. You don’t get used to pain; time cannot lessen a wound that cannot heal. You do get used to the adaptations and trade-offs you make to keep on, keeping on. It took me two years of concentrated effort to learn not to limp.

My current project sounds hokey in writing; it is learning to have my smile be my normal facial expression, not my pain. I think it got harder, once I became aware that people thought I looked mad a lot. Unknowingly, I developed a crooked grin, almost like I was sneering – that was even worse! I see the different treatments when you don’t limp, and do smile.

The sleeping pills, the side-effects and other sicknesses the meds produce, the hours lost awake in waiting rooms and treatment rooms and labs, just waiting, reading, books and people. Or most surprisingly, of finding a nurse or medical staff in one of those rooms that cares rather than condescends. Mental and physical motions; I treasure them for it.

People see me walking in the valley, in Rocky River or Tremont and say how are you able to do that, given the Rheumatoid and my cracked back, rusting thru at the core. But I know, if I don’t do it today, I won’t be able to do it tomorrow. It is the only way I have found to keep the progression and the pain at bay. Moments of fight or flow are so often choices of action over the fire or over the couch.

My young nephew, riding in a car with my sister, passed me walking on Rocky River Drive one day. He made his mom turn around, and go back; I wasn’t moving too well. It was cute. In those mostly daily walks, hard time breathing doesn’t stop me, the pain does. I have no kids of my own; I wonder what those 17 nieces and nephews memories of me will be.

Everyone has a story. Everyone is fighting a battle we both know nothing about, and often, we’d be struck in awe if we did. Their particular strength, just suited, selected and bestowed to fight that particular and personal war, is one of those unique gifts we always hear about. Impossible to understand; I bow, fight where I can make an impact, and accept: I understand that your ways, are not My ways, says the Lord.

No matter the cross, we can say, Why me? More than likely, that question is something we shall never know. Did I Eat, Move, Breathe in, the wrong way, the wrong thing? Did God send me that challenge because He trusted me to handle it, and share? Oh the fools, the fools! We are full of lessons for ourselves and others; some are sins of commission, some of omission.

Will the next med be “the One”? I’ve had luck good and bad in 29 years of RA. Meds are meant to erase pain, or at least mask it. I was on Naproxen and Lyrica for three months, with no relief. The Dr said, too soon; try another three months. I did; I didn’t lose any pain, but I did lose six months.

Finally, Sept 2nd, an appointment with the Dr, an RA specialist I have been going to for just over 16 years. On September 5th I was back for blood work; the results came back September 11th, and showed liver damage. The Dr. said stop the Naproxen immediately.

At the September 2nd appointment, the Dr. suggested a new medicine, called Simponi; my choices were self injection weekly, or infusion every other month. I chose the infusion, for I had done it before, when on Remicaide. She said her Assistant would call my insurance, check on what they would cover, and if the manufacturer would help with the rest, and get back to me.

After three weeks, I called the Referral Line and left a message. Two weeks later, I called the assistant. She was vague, and obviously knew nothing of the medicine, or the Dr’s orders. We then traded voicemails for two weeks. She has told me in the past that she did not have time to return patient calls. When we finally connected, on October 17th, 45 days after the Dr. appointment, she didn’t know costs, didn’t know what insurance would cover. I could call the transfusion center myself if I wanted to [i.e. if I don’t like it; leave].

She was flippant and condescending, exasperated that I was taking her time. So on October 23rd; I called the transfusion center at St. John’s and asked the nurse. She said she had no orders from the Dr. She was one of those ones I mentioned above, one of those that really care about people. She took my info, and said she would call herself; a short while later, she called back. 2 hours vs. 45 days.

I could get the Simponi, 7 doses per year, at a cost of $18,152 per dose.

Simponi is a “specialty med”, so not covered by Pharmacy; I would have to pay “charges for therapy”. I would have to pay $500.00 deductible per year first, and the $5,000 out of pocket maximum per year. She didn’t know if the drug manufacturer would help with that.

Breathing effects and lightheadedness etc… from meds is ever present. I am Off everything now. The Lyrica ran out, and the Simponi has not been set up.

CVS called. They have my vial of Simponi. Whut? It is a transfusion, why would I be picking it up at CVS? So I called the Dr.’s office. Very specifically, I said I wished to speak to the Dr., NOT her assistant. The assistant called back.

Full of justification, she “had the paperwork right there if I wanted to come look at it, she didn’t call CVS”. Dunno why CVS called me then – how would my local drug store have gotten the orders for Simponi, if she hadn’t sent them, I asked?

She rode over me, repeatedly. Three times I asked to please have the Dr. call me when available. She ignored me, and continued on with her reasons why she was not at fault. After the 3rd request, I hung up. I’ve not heard from the Dr since September 2nd.

I posted about Simponi on Facebook, and the response, suggestions and support was astounding. Both wrists, right hand, hips and back burn incessantly. Ankles and shoulders are slipping back into pain. Shaking hands starts with a wince of what’s coming, since life-long lessons to shake firmly and confidently, rip and burn, through the bones of my hand to my wrist. I know it’s coming. I’ve taken to shaking with my left hand. People are kind; they get it.

The support of people, on Facebook and in person means far more than the meds. Do not lead, I may not be able to follow; do not follow, I may not be able to lead; Walk beside me, and Oh, what we will achieve.

My insurance reup period for next year is December 31. I am going to switch to the County plan, at Metro, where more costs are covered, and try really, really hard, to hit the lottery; I will continue to pray too. Till then, keep dancing with me, hugs over handshakes.

Got Joe?

Got Joe?

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100 things to Not Miss in November

November 1st, 2014

Out & About Ohio November 2014

Brooklyn – Hooley House!
7th -Velvet Shake, 14th – Charlie in the Box, 21st – Big in Japan, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Jukebox Heroes, 28th – Brigid’s Cross, 29th – Breakfast Club. 10310 Cascade Crossing, Brooklyn. 216-362-7700. 1FunPub.com

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center
1st – 5th Anniversary Celebration Gala Green Tie Affair 6pm: Music, Food, Dance, Whiskey and Wine Tastings, Silent Auction, Art Exhibit, Museum, & Library; 2nd - Acting Irish International Theater Festival Fall Meeting; 8th – 1950s Sock Hop; 20th -Irish Pub Music Night. Tue & Thu: Irish language, music, dance classes. For genealogy sessions, call for appt. Book now for parties, meetings, classes, film screenings or events. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100. www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

ALL under Cleveland;

Kristine Jackson: 7th – Flat Iron, 9th Treehouse, 22nd – Flannerys, 28th – The Harp,

Kristine Jackson: 7th – Flat Iron, 9th Treehouse, 22nd – Flannerys, 28th – The Harp,

The Harp
1st – The Porter Sharks, 5th – Lonesome Stars, 7th – Irish Session, 8th – Chris Allen, 12th – Chris & Tom, 14th – Walking Cane, 15th – Fior Gael, 19th – Lonesome Stars, 21st – Pitch the Peat, 22nd – Chris Allen, 26th – Chris & Tom, 28th – Kristine Jackson, 29th – The Porter Sharks. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com

Stone Mad
2nd – Traditional Irish Session, 9th – Walking Cane, 16th – Heather Venesile Jazz Duo, 30th – Chris Allen. Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500

Flat Iron Café
7th – Kristine Jackson, 14th – Donegal Doggs, 21st – Chad Hoffman, 28th – Donal O’Shaughnessy. 1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216.696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com

Ohio City Singers: 20th – Treehouse

Ohio City Singers: 20th – Treehouse

Treehouse
2nd -Chris Allen; 9th -Kristine Jackson; 16th -Pat Shepard; 20th – TURKEY
JAM Ohio City Singers 8:00 pm; 23rd – Jeff Sherman; 30th – Brent Kirby. 820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com

PJ McIntyre’s
1st – Abby Normal, 5th – Monthly Pub Quiz w/ Mike D. 7pm. 7th – House Tunes, 8th – Charlie in the Box, 13th – Craic Brothers, 14th – Craic Band, 15th – New Barleycorn, 21st – Whiskey Sinners, 22nd – Crazy Chester, 26th – THANKSGIVING EVE w/ Marys Lane, 27th – Happy Thanksgiving! Open @7pm, 28th – Hot Carl, 29th – Velvetshake.
Cavs and Browns Specials! Irish Language Classes Every Tuesday. Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. A Local 10 Union establishment / Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.

West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.

Flannery’s Pub
1st – the Bar Flies, 7th- The Higbees, 8th- Claire Stuczynski, 14th – The Bar Flies, 15th – Brent Kirby, 21st – Walking Cane, 22nd – Kristine Jackson, 28th & 29th- New Barleycorn, PLUS: Winterfest on East 4th Street – Ice sculptures, complimentary hot cider, tree lightings, carolers, crafts for kids & More. 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side
2nd – Craft Fair, 7th – Mary Agnes Kennedy, 8th – The Great Pretenders, 19th – Annual Lip Synch Show $8, 14th – Pop the Cork @ Club Dinner, 20th – Steak Shoot, 21st – Donegal Doggs. PUB: 7:30 – 10:30. IACES 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
Trad Sessiún 3rd Wednesday. 414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org

Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina
Sully’s
1st – Craic Brothers, 7th – Marys Lane, 8th – New Barleycorn, 14th – High Strung Irish, 15th – Mossy Moran, 21st – Westside Steve, 22nd – Marys Lane, 26th – The Music Men, 28th – Smug Saints, 29th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 21st to 23rd – Medina’s 30th Annual Candlelight Walk. 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House
7th – Cocktail Johnny, 14th – Jukebox Heroes, 15th – Abbey Rodeo, 21st – Almost Famous, 22nd – Brigid’s Cross, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Samantha Fitzpatrick, 28th – School Girl Crush, 29th – Monica Robbins & the Ninja Cowboys. All starts @9:30. Every Tuesday – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Every Wednesday – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great live music and food in the Pub every Friday. 9th – “25” Card Game, 27th Annual Mass and Raffle. 22nd _ Monthly Steak Soot, 30th – Annual Trim-A-Tree Gathering. WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Westlake
Hooley House
7th – New Barleycorn, 21st – Cocktail Johnny, 26th – Thanksgiving Eve Party w Charlie in the Box, 28t – Matt Johnson’s Piano Fiasco, 29th – Brigid’s Cross. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. 
1FunPub.com
(440) 835-2890

Willoughby
Mullarkey’s
7th – Madison Crawl Trio, 8th – Pat Shepard, 14th – Eric Butler, 115th – Dan McCoy, 21st – Mo Andrews, 22nd – Mossy Moran, 28th – 107.09 Band, 29th – The Thrifters. Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com

Tara Hall
Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. No Cover. Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

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The Winds of November

November 1st, 2014

Bronze or pottery are the traditional 8th anniversary gifts, with linens and lace being the more modern gifts associated with the 8th wedding anniversary. Symbols for an 8th Ohio Irish American News Anniversary?? I think they just happen to coincide with the highlights we are heavily blessed with this season, on everyone’s calendar: Thanksgiving and Christmas; all over again.

As you can see by the size of this issue, we keep growing. Two new columnists join us this month, making it six this year ~ Variety, humor, things we never knew, or have forgotten; great stories, written into life.

We welcome new columnists Katherine Boyd, writing on her roots search, tips, and a few findings a long the way; and Anne Waters, writing a series on the Forever Seven signers of The Proclamation, delivered April 24th, 1916, to start of the Easter Rising. The 100th Anniversary of the Rising strikes, in 2016.

Kat and Anne join Catherine Gallagher Kearney, Richard Lardie, Frances McGarry and Lisa O’Rourke, columnists who joined us earlier this year. We are growing, because of your support. Our new Cleveland Account Manager, Robin Neorr, has also started with a bang, and is working hard to help us make that leap from success, to significance.

What else would you like to see in your Ohio Irish American News?

Greater Cleveland An Gorta Mor (The Great Hunger) Memorial Mass

Greater Cleveland An Gorta Mor (The Great Hunger) Memorial Mass

The 14th Annual Greater Cleveland Famine Memorial Mass was held in mid-September. The ten-ton, ten foot high granite stone placed just down river from Irish Town Bed, and across from The Flat Iron, is a point of pride and respect, and for most a summer highlight of reflection and gratitude not to be missed. The Flat Iron is Cleveland Oldest Irish Pub, and served as a bed, and a mailbox, for longshoreman, sailors and those freshly arrived to our shores. It is well earned, and fitting.

The unveiling of the Johnny Kilbane Statue, at Battery Park

The unveiling of the Johnny Kilbane Statue, at Battery Park

Cleveland’s own World Boxing Champion (1912-1923), Johnny Kilbane, is featured on our cover. Johnny lived in Battery Park (West 75th Street area) while holding the World Championship, longer than any boxer in history, before or since. A statue by world renowned Irish Scupltor Rowan Gillespie was placed in a newly constructed and renovated park area right off the tracks, full of symbolism and story, for both Johnny, and the neighborhood – written from the fists and the service of a man finally receiving his due.
The words Thank You are not enough, but we offer them sincerely, so that Ohioans, past and present, may know, we are grateful for your continued, and ever growing, support.

Slán,
John

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***

November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

November 2014 Cover of the Ohio Irish American News, featuring the Johnny Kilbane statue in Battery Park

Milestones:

Congratulations to Jim & Sue Henderson, retiring as owners of Gaelic Imports. The Hendersons have been offering the Gaelic Imports style traditon since the 60s. Jim & Sue have been big supporters of the OhIAN since our start; we wish them great health and great fun, in their retirement.

Congratulations to Mike Kearney, celebrating 35 years with Laborers Local 310.

Congratulations to Amy and Colm Carr on the birth of Cillian Patrick Carr, 7lbs 12 oz. 21 inches!

An Irish Halloween

October 31st, 2014

An Irish Halloween:

Banshees are not the bringers of death, but rather the speakers for the soon to be dead. They sing of the deeds done by the soon to be departed, but to mortal ears, only the keening wail is heard. She is solitary faire woman, mourning and forewarning those only of the best families in Ireland, those with most ancient Celtic lineages, whose names begin with ‘Mac/Mc’ or ‘O’. According to tradition, the banshee can only cry for five major Irish families: the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors, the O’Gradys and the Kavanaghs.

Intermarriage has since extended this select list. Each Banshee has her own mortal family and out of love she follows the old race across the ocean to distant lands. Her wails or keen can be heard in America and England, wherever the true Irish have settled.

When someone is about to die, the Banshee appears at the family’s home during the night and weeps and wails. Sometimes, the Banshee cries for several nights in a row. Her sharp, cries and wails are also called ‘keen’. The wail of a banshee pierces the night, its notes rising and falling like the waves of the sea, it always announces a mortal’s death. It is said that when a member of the beloved race is dying, she paces the dark hills about his house. She sharply contrasts against the night’s blackness, her white figure emerges with silver-grey hair streaming to the ground and a grey-white cloak of a cobweb texture clinging to her tall thin body. Her face is pale, her eyes red with centuries of crying. Unseen, banshees attend the funerals of the beloved dead. Although, sometimes she can be heard wailing, her voice blending in with the mournful cries of others.

In some parts of Leinster, she is referred to as the bean chaointe (keening woman) whose wail can be so piercing that it shatters glass. In Kerry, the keen is experienced as a “low, pleasant singing”; in Tyrone as “the sound of two boards being struck together”; and on Rathlin Island as “a thin, screeching sound somewhere between the wail of a woman and the moan of an owl”.

It is possible to offend a Bean Sidhe (banshee). Never cut down a Faerie tree, or move an ancient boundary marker. Or disturb her while she laments the dead. If you’ve managed to get yourself into one of the bean sidhes bad books, go to the place where she most often appears after dark and leave a peace offering of bread. If it is gone the next day, you know that all is forgiven. If not, you must have really got her angry. It is said that if you meet one and she gives you her name, do not tell anyone else her name as she’ll never forgive such an intrusion of her privacy.

A word of warning, an Adh Sidhe should never be confused with a bean sidhe. Similar in appearance to the Banshee, the Adh Sidhe are spirits that are only seen by people who have an unclear conscience. They appear as either beautiful women who lure the evil to their destruction, or as sleek, terrifying black horses with red glowing eyes. You have been warned……….

Samhain. All Hallows. All Hallow’s Eve. Hallow E’en. Halloween. So many terms, all Hallow’s Eve is the eve of All Hallow’s Day (November 1). And for once, even popular tradition remembers that the eve is more important than the day itself, the traditional celebration focusing on October 31, beginning at sundown. Halloween is a Celtic holiday, ancient, before the written word. The Celts called it Samhain, which means “summer’s end”, according to their ancient twofold division of the year, when summer ran from Beltane to Samhain and winter ran from Samhain to Beltane.

Samhain is pronounced (depending on where you’re from) as “sow-in” (in Ireland), or “sow-een” (in Wales), or “sav-en” (in Scotland), or (inevitably) “sam-hane” (in the U.S., where not many speak Gaelic). Samhain was seen as the end of the year by the Celts, a new years eve. The new year itself began at sundown of Halloween night with the onset of the dark phase of the year. The night itself is a celebration of the dead.

Irish Haloween 2

As a feast of the dead, this was the one night when the dead could, if they wished, return to the land of the living, to celebrate with their family, tribe, or clan. And so the great burial mounds of Ireland (sidhe mounds) were opened up, with lighted torches lining the walls, so the dead could find their way. Extra places were set at the table and food set out for any who had died that year. And there are many stories that tell of Irish heroes making raids on the Underworld while the gates of fairy stood open, though all must return to their appointed places by cockcrow.

It is also classed as a Celtic feast of divination. The reason for this has to do with the Celtic view of time. In a culture that uses a linear concept of time, like our modern one, New Year’s Eve is simply a milestone on a very long road that stretches in a straight line from birth to death. Thus, the New Year’s festival is a part of time.

The ancient Celtic view of time, however, is cyclical. And in this framework, New Year’s Eve represents a point outside of time, when the natural order of the universe dissolves back into primordial chaos, preparatory to reestablishing itself in a new order. Thus, Samhain is a night that exists outside of time and, hence, it may be used to view any other point in time. At no other holiday is a tarot card reading, crystal reading, or tealeaf reading so likely to succeed.

The jack-o’-lantern is a well known symbol of Samhain. It’s of Celtic origin, when those who had to travel on All Hallows Eve carried lanterns with scary faces painted on them. These were meant to help scare away fairies and dark spirits. These were also placed outside households, to help keep them safe from demonic forces that roamed that night. Nowadays, the pumpkin seems to have taken its place.

The custom of dressing in costume and “trick-or-treating” is of Celtic origin. However, there are some important differences from the modern version. In the first place, the custom was not relegated to children, but was actively indulged in by adults as well. Also, the “treat” that was required was often one of spirits (the liquid variety). This has recently been revived by college students who go ‘trick-or-drinking’.

In ancient times, the roving bands would sing seasonal carols from house-to-house, making the tradition very similar to Christmas. In fact, the custom known as caroling, now connected exclusively with Christmas, was once practiced at all the major holidays. Also, the costume often consisted of nothing more than dressing up like the opposite sex. It seems as though ancient societies provided an opportunity for people to “try on” the role of the opposite gender for one night of the year; Celtic cross-dressing if you like.

On Halloween night in present-day Ireland, adults and children dress up as creatures from the underworld (ghosts, ghouls, zombies, witches, goblins), light bonfires and have firework displays. Children walk around to all the houses in their neighborhood looking for candy and nuts. Salt is still sometimes sprinkled in the children’s hair, to ward off evil spirits.

Houses are covered in decorations. The traditional Samhain cake is served, called bairin breac (a type of fruit bread). Every member of the family gets a slice. Contained within the cake are three objects, a piece of rag, a coin and a ring. If you get the rag then your financial future is doubtful. If you get the coin then you can look forward to a prosperous year. Getting the ring is a sure sign of impending romance or continued happiness. Naturally, the most important thing to remember is that Halloween has been around a lot longer than Christianity. It was the church that finally abolished (tried to anyway) the old pagan day of the dead and changed it to All Saints Day.

Out & About Ohio this weekend, from your Ohio Irish American News

October 24th, 2014

Out & About Ohio October 2014, from your Ohio Irish American News

Brooklyn – The Hooley House – Brooklyn!
24th – Faction, 31st – Hooleyween party w Top Dog. 10310 Cascade Crossing, Brooklyn 216-362-7700. 1FunPub.com

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center of Greater Cincinnati
11/1 – Green Tie Affair: Dinner, Music, Dance, Song, Whiskey, Wine tasting and more. Tues: Irish Language Classes / Irish Music Classes, Center Tours, Library open. Thurs: Irish Dance Classes w McGing School of Dance, beginners welcome. Genealogy by appointment. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100, www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

ALL under Cleveland;
Music Box Supper Club
24th – Carbon Leaf 1148 Main Avenue, Cleveland

The Harp
24th – brent kirby, 25th – chris allen, 29th -lonesome stars. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com

STONE MAD PUB, RESTAURANT AND BOCCE
26th – Chris Allen. Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500

Flat Iron Cafe
24th – Cats On Holiday, 31st – Chad Hoffman. 1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216.696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com

Treehouse Bar
820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com

PJ McIntyre’s
24th – Disco Inferno, 25th – Halloween Party w STONE PONY (Springsteen Cover Band) – Cash Prizes for best Costume!!
Check out our Amazing Cavs, Browns Specials as well as our NEW MENU!!!
Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. PJ McIntyre’s is a Local 10 Union establishment. Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.

West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.

Flannery’s Pub
24th – Bar Flies, 25th – Walking Cane, 31st – Halloween Party. 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side, Inc
24th- Celtic Fright Night w Sumrade $15 w Cash Prizes best costume. 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
24- 26, 31st – [title of show]. 17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org.
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina
Sully’s Irish Pub

26th - Sully's 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, plus Haloween events all weekend

26th – Sully’s 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, plus Haloween events all weekend

24th – High Strung Irish, 25th – Sully’s Octoberfest w The Polka Pirates, 26th – Sully’s 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, 31st – Sully’s Halloween Costume Party w The Music Men. 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House – Mentor
24th – Cocktail Johnny, 31st – Hooleyween party w the band Collage. All starts @9:30. Tues: – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Wed: – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great food & live music every Friday in The Pub. 24th – Children’s Halloween Party, WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Westlake
The Hooley House – Westlake
24th – School Girl Crush, 31st – Hooleyween Party w Breakfast Club. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. 1FunPub.com(440) 835-2890

Willoughby
John Mullarkey’s
24th – 107.9 Band, 25th – West Side Steve, 31st – DJ. Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Tara Hall
Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

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Ireland’s Past & Present: Don’t Forget Us; from this month’s issue of the Ohio Irish American News

October 18th, 2014

Ireland Past & Present: Don’t Forget Us
by Niamh O’Sullivan

My contribution this month is a selection of memories examining my sense of ease with the large number of artefacts contained in the Kilmainham Collection; it developed simply because of the length of time I worked in that museum. Ultimately, those artefacts narrate the same story; that of the struggle for Irish Independence between the years 1796 and 1924 – spanning the lifetime of Kilmainham Prison. What they really do, is tell the story of the men and women who took part in that struggle during those 128 years.

Working daily with these objects, and by implication with these extraordinary people, does foster a certain sense of familiarity. I have unquestionably come to consider them as friends, if such can be imagined.

I have read their letters, diaries, and newspaper articles, I have held in my own hands objects which they treasured. I often met their families, and heard the smaller, non-heroic stories which can make them seem more real.

I recall a conversation I once had with a colleague. We were just leaving our staff canteen, a guard cell in the East Wing, talking as usual about our ‘favourite’ prisoners. In a manner that only makes sense if you have been immersed in the building itself, let alone its ghostly inmates, my colleague figured that after some time, we come to look on death differently in Kilmainham.

After all, we spend every day discussing Patrick Pearse, or TF Meagher, Anne Devlin or Robert Emmet; debating their lives and their actions, and we’d even venture into their thoughts without blinking! Therefore, in the jail, we evolved a different method of contemplating death. Our prisoners were only technically dead – they lived on every day in Kilmainham, their presence lingering, occasionally even heightened, by their pencil written words still surrounding us on their cell walls.

I recall an occasion in the Archives, many years ago. The man in charge of maintaining the prison building had called into my office. The conversation turned to Eamonn Ceannt, executed for his role in the 1916 Rising. I explained how a box in a downstairs room contained Eamonn Ceannt’s pipes, including pieces he used when he played for the Pope in 1911. Tom was fascinated, being a pipe player himself. We had to go down to look.

With the utmost reverence and caution, Tom slowly assembled the pipes, and after several extremely careful attempts, he got them to ring out. Having been wrapped in their box for at least forty years, they sounded slightly off and rusty, but the deep melancholic tones were pure magic, providing a spine-tingling few moments in a building that has known such misery and pain. Ceannt’s ghost hovered over us for those few precious notes.

Ireland Pn P ceannt

An event which happened a few weeks ago made me remember other feelings experienced in Kilmainham. I was visiting my uncle, Terry O’Brien, down the road in Callan. Whilst talking about family and the past, he left the room to return with an object carefully wrapped in an old newspaper. It was a meticulously preserved green AOH (Ancient Order of Hibernians) sash, with a fringe of heavy gold thread. It presented beautifully embroidered Irish symbols such as the harp and shamrocks. It had belonged to his grandfather in Donegal. Wondering how old it might be, we checked the date on the newspaper, which would provide us with at least a minimal age. 14 August, 1938. The day we looked at the sash was, by chance, 14 August, 2014. A frequent visitor to Kilmainham, a relative of another executed leader of 1916, had explained to me years ago his gut feeling of how this sort of mysterious incident was a request by our precious people from the past: Don’t forget us.

Two such events feature strongly amongst my memories of Kilmainham. A visitor once brought me a letter attached to the inside of the front cover of her ancient family bible, which I recognised instantly, and with great anxiety! It was the last letter written in Kilmainham to his sister by John Sheares on 10-11 July, 1798, mere days before his trial and execution for High Treason. But that very letter was on display in our museum! While my visitor took a tour, I trawled through the archives for everything we had catalogued featuring Sheares, in an effort to solve the puzzle. The visitor’s letter turned out to be a precise replica of our original letter, but since it had been published in a 1930s newspaper and pasted for so long into the bible, it had aged with the book and initially appeared authentic. I brought the visitor into a cell we believe was occupied by Sheares and we stood in silent thought. Mentally checking the date, it suddenly occurred to me that we were present in the very cell where Sheares could have written that letter, 199 years to the day.

A further coincidence involved an original, early 1800s, death mask of Robert Emmet. It was brought in on loan for display in our Emmet Bicentennial Exhibition by a member of the family who currently own it. We unwrapped it and studied it closely; I am strangely in awe of death masks, with their unnerving immediacy. Once again, inexplicably, I experienced that eerie consciousness of an accidental date: it was 26 August, 2003. Exactly two hundred years to the day since Robert Emmet’s actual committal to Kilmainham Prison, after his capture in Harold’s Cross, Dublin. Don’t forget us.

The Kilmainham Collection does contain its own death masks of both Robert Emmet and Wolfe Tone. These would be masks made from masks, but still of sufficient significance to be highly valued. Instead of placing them on permanent display, we commissioned an artist to make replicas of both, which we could then exhibit. The artist seemed rather relieved when he delivered the finished masks. I had to ask why – he replied that he had kept them in his spare room at home. He could have sworn that he could hear them talking to each other at night. Life behind the scenes in a museum!

Issue #94, October 2014

Issue #94, October 2014

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