An Irish Halloween

October 31st, 2014

An Irish Halloween:

Banshees are not the bringers of death, but rather the speakers for the soon to be dead. They sing of the deeds done by the soon to be departed, but to mortal ears, only the keening wail is heard. She is solitary faire woman, mourning and forewarning those only of the best families in Ireland, those with most ancient Celtic lineages, whose names begin with ‘Mac/Mc’ or ‘O’. According to tradition, the banshee can only cry for five major Irish families: the O’Neills, the O’Briens, the O’Connors, the O’Gradys and the Kavanaghs.

Intermarriage has since extended this select list. Each Banshee has her own mortal family and out of love she follows the old race across the ocean to distant lands. Her wails or keen can be heard in America and England, wherever the true Irish have settled.

When someone is about to die, the Banshee appears at the family’s home during the night and weeps and wails. Sometimes, the Banshee cries for several nights in a row. Her sharp, cries and wails are also called ‘keen’. The wail of a banshee pierces the night, its notes rising and falling like the waves of the sea, it always announces a mortal’s death. It is said that when a member of the beloved race is dying, she paces the dark hills about his house. She sharply contrasts against the night’s blackness, her white figure emerges with silver-grey hair streaming to the ground and a grey-white cloak of a cobweb texture clinging to her tall thin body. Her face is pale, her eyes red with centuries of crying. Unseen, banshees attend the funerals of the beloved dead. Although, sometimes she can be heard wailing, her voice blending in with the mournful cries of others.

In some parts of Leinster, she is referred to as the bean chaointe (keening woman) whose wail can be so piercing that it shatters glass. In Kerry, the keen is experienced as a “low, pleasant singing”; in Tyrone as “the sound of two boards being struck together”; and on Rathlin Island as “a thin, screeching sound somewhere between the wail of a woman and the moan of an owl”.

It is possible to offend a Bean Sidhe (banshee). Never cut down a Faerie tree, or move an ancient boundary marker. Or disturb her while she laments the dead. If you’ve managed to get yourself into one of the bean sidhes bad books, go to the place where she most often appears after dark and leave a peace offering of bread. If it is gone the next day, you know that all is forgiven. If not, you must have really got her angry. It is said that if you meet one and she gives you her name, do not tell anyone else her name as she’ll never forgive such an intrusion of her privacy.

A word of warning, an Adh Sidhe should never be confused with a bean sidhe. Similar in appearance to the Banshee, the Adh Sidhe are spirits that are only seen by people who have an unclear conscience. They appear as either beautiful women who lure the evil to their destruction, or as sleek, terrifying black horses with red glowing eyes. You have been warned……….

Samhain. All Hallows. All Hallow’s Eve. Hallow E’en. Halloween. So many terms, all Hallow’s Eve is the eve of All Hallow’s Day (November 1). And for once, even popular tradition remembers that the eve is more important than the day itself, the traditional celebration focusing on October 31, beginning at sundown. Halloween is a Celtic holiday, ancient, before the written word. The Celts called it Samhain, which means “summer’s end”, according to their ancient twofold division of the year, when summer ran from Beltane to Samhain and winter ran from Samhain to Beltane.

Samhain is pronounced (depending on where you’re from) as “sow-in” (in Ireland), or “sow-een” (in Wales), or “sav-en” (in Scotland), or (inevitably) “sam-hane” (in the U.S., where not many speak Gaelic). Samhain was seen as the end of the year by the Celts, a new years eve. The new year itself began at sundown of Halloween night with the onset of the dark phase of the year. The night itself is a celebration of the dead.

Irish Haloween 2

As a feast of the dead, this was the one night when the dead could, if they wished, return to the land of the living, to celebrate with their family, tribe, or clan. And so the great burial mounds of Ireland (sidhe mounds) were opened up, with lighted torches lining the walls, so the dead could find their way. Extra places were set at the table and food set out for any who had died that year. And there are many stories that tell of Irish heroes making raids on the Underworld while the gates of fairy stood open, though all must return to their appointed places by cockcrow.

It is also classed as a Celtic feast of divination. The reason for this has to do with the Celtic view of time. In a culture that uses a linear concept of time, like our modern one, New Year’s Eve is simply a milestone on a very long road that stretches in a straight line from birth to death. Thus, the New Year’s festival is a part of time.

The ancient Celtic view of time, however, is cyclical. And in this framework, New Year’s Eve represents a point outside of time, when the natural order of the universe dissolves back into primordial chaos, preparatory to reestablishing itself in a new order. Thus, Samhain is a night that exists outside of time and, hence, it may be used to view any other point in time. At no other holiday is a tarot card reading, crystal reading, or tealeaf reading so likely to succeed.

The jack-o’-lantern is a well known symbol of Samhain. It’s of Celtic origin, when those who had to travel on All Hallows Eve carried lanterns with scary faces painted on them. These were meant to help scare away fairies and dark spirits. These were also placed outside households, to help keep them safe from demonic forces that roamed that night. Nowadays, the pumpkin seems to have taken its place.

The custom of dressing in costume and “trick-or-treating” is of Celtic origin. However, there are some important differences from the modern version. In the first place, the custom was not relegated to children, but was actively indulged in by adults as well. Also, the “treat” that was required was often one of spirits (the liquid variety). This has recently been revived by college students who go ‘trick-or-drinking’.

In ancient times, the roving bands would sing seasonal carols from house-to-house, making the tradition very similar to Christmas. In fact, the custom known as caroling, now connected exclusively with Christmas, was once practiced at all the major holidays. Also, the costume often consisted of nothing more than dressing up like the opposite sex. It seems as though ancient societies provided an opportunity for people to “try on” the role of the opposite gender for one night of the year; Celtic cross-dressing if you like.

On Halloween night in present-day Ireland, adults and children dress up as creatures from the underworld (ghosts, ghouls, zombies, witches, goblins), light bonfires and have firework displays. Children walk around to all the houses in their neighborhood looking for candy and nuts. Salt is still sometimes sprinkled in the children’s hair, to ward off evil spirits.

Houses are covered in decorations. The traditional Samhain cake is served, called bairin breac (a type of fruit bread). Every member of the family gets a slice. Contained within the cake are three objects, a piece of rag, a coin and a ring. If you get the rag then your financial future is doubtful. If you get the coin then you can look forward to a prosperous year. Getting the ring is a sure sign of impending romance or continued happiness. Naturally, the most important thing to remember is that Halloween has been around a lot longer than Christianity. It was the church that finally abolished (tried to anyway) the old pagan day of the dead and changed it to All Saints Day.

Out & About Ohio this weekend, from your Ohio Irish American News

October 24th, 2014

Out & About Ohio October 2014, from your Ohio Irish American News

Brooklyn – The Hooley House – Brooklyn!
24th – Faction, 31st – Hooleyween party w Top Dog. 10310 Cascade Crossing, Brooklyn 216-362-7700. 1FunPub.com

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center of Greater Cincinnati
11/1 – Green Tie Affair: Dinner, Music, Dance, Song, Whiskey, Wine tasting and more. Tues: Irish Language Classes / Irish Music Classes, Center Tours, Library open. Thurs: Irish Dance Classes w McGing School of Dance, beginners welcome. Genealogy by appointment. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100, www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

ALL under Cleveland;
Music Box Supper Club
24th – Carbon Leaf 1148 Main Avenue, Cleveland

The Harp
24th – brent kirby, 25th – chris allen, 29th -lonesome stars. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com

STONE MAD PUB, RESTAURANT AND BOCCE
26th – Chris Allen. Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500

Flat Iron Cafe
24th – Cats On Holiday, 31st – Chad Hoffman. 1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216.696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com

Treehouse Bar
820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com

PJ McIntyre’s
24th – Disco Inferno, 25th – Halloween Party w STONE PONY (Springsteen Cover Band) – Cash Prizes for best Costume!!
Check out our Amazing Cavs, Browns Specials as well as our NEW MENU!!!
Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. PJ McIntyre’s is a Local 10 Union establishment. Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.

West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.

Flannery’s Pub
24th – Bar Flies, 25th – Walking Cane, 31st – Halloween Party. 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side, Inc
24th- Celtic Fright Night w Sumrade $15 w Cash Prizes best costume. 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
24- 26, 31st – [title of show]. 17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org.
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina
Sully’s Irish Pub

26th - Sully's 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, plus Haloween events all weekend

26th – Sully’s 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, plus Haloween events all weekend

24th – High Strung Irish, 25th – Sully’s Octoberfest w The Polka Pirates, 26th – Sully’s 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, 31st – Sully’s Halloween Costume Party w The Music Men. 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House – Mentor
24th – Cocktail Johnny, 31st – Hooleyween party w the band Collage. All starts @9:30. Tues: – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Wed: – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great food & live music every Friday in The Pub. 24th – Children’s Halloween Party, WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Westlake
The Hooley House – Westlake
24th – School Girl Crush, 31st – Hooleyween Party w Breakfast Club. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. 1FunPub.com(440) 835-2890

Willoughby
John Mullarkey’s
24th – 107.9 Band, 25th – West Side Steve, 31st – DJ. Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Tara Hall
Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

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Ireland’s Past & Present: Don’t Forget Us; from this month’s issue of the Ohio Irish American News

October 18th, 2014

Ireland Past & Present: Don’t Forget Us
by Niamh O’Sullivan

My contribution this month is a selection of memories examining my sense of ease with the large number of artefacts contained in the Kilmainham Collection; it developed simply because of the length of time I worked in that museum. Ultimately, those artefacts narrate the same story; that of the struggle for Irish Independence between the years 1796 and 1924 – spanning the lifetime of Kilmainham Prison. What they really do, is tell the story of the men and women who took part in that struggle during those 128 years.

Working daily with these objects, and by implication with these extraordinary people, does foster a certain sense of familiarity. I have unquestionably come to consider them as friends, if such can be imagined.

I have read their letters, diaries, and newspaper articles, I have held in my own hands objects which they treasured. I often met their families, and heard the smaller, non-heroic stories which can make them seem more real.

I recall a conversation I once had with a colleague. We were just leaving our staff canteen, a guard cell in the East Wing, talking as usual about our ‘favourite’ prisoners. In a manner that only makes sense if you have been immersed in the building itself, let alone its ghostly inmates, my colleague figured that after some time, we come to look on death differently in Kilmainham.

After all, we spend every day discussing Patrick Pearse, or TF Meagher, Anne Devlin or Robert Emmet; debating their lives and their actions, and we’d even venture into their thoughts without blinking! Therefore, in the jail, we evolved a different method of contemplating death. Our prisoners were only technically dead – they lived on every day in Kilmainham, their presence lingering, occasionally even heightened, by their pencil written words still surrounding us on their cell walls.

I recall an occasion in the Archives, many years ago. The man in charge of maintaining the prison building had called into my office. The conversation turned to Eamonn Ceannt, executed for his role in the 1916 Rising. I explained how a box in a downstairs room contained Eamonn Ceannt’s pipes, including pieces he used when he played for the Pope in 1911. Tom was fascinated, being a pipe player himself. We had to go down to look.

With the utmost reverence and caution, Tom slowly assembled the pipes, and after several extremely careful attempts, he got them to ring out. Having been wrapped in their box for at least forty years, they sounded slightly off and rusty, but the deep melancholic tones were pure magic, providing a spine-tingling few moments in a building that has known such misery and pain. Ceannt’s ghost hovered over us for those few precious notes.

Ireland Pn P ceannt

An event which happened a few weeks ago made me remember other feelings experienced in Kilmainham. I was visiting my uncle, Terry O’Brien, down the road in Callan. Whilst talking about family and the past, he left the room to return with an object carefully wrapped in an old newspaper. It was a meticulously preserved green AOH (Ancient Order of Hibernians) sash, with a fringe of heavy gold thread. It presented beautifully embroidered Irish symbols such as the harp and shamrocks. It had belonged to his grandfather in Donegal. Wondering how old it might be, we checked the date on the newspaper, which would provide us with at least a minimal age. 14 August, 1938. The day we looked at the sash was, by chance, 14 August, 2014. A frequent visitor to Kilmainham, a relative of another executed leader of 1916, had explained to me years ago his gut feeling of how this sort of mysterious incident was a request by our precious people from the past: Don’t forget us.

Two such events feature strongly amongst my memories of Kilmainham. A visitor once brought me a letter attached to the inside of the front cover of her ancient family bible, which I recognised instantly, and with great anxiety! It was the last letter written in Kilmainham to his sister by John Sheares on 10-11 July, 1798, mere days before his trial and execution for High Treason. But that very letter was on display in our museum! While my visitor took a tour, I trawled through the archives for everything we had catalogued featuring Sheares, in an effort to solve the puzzle. The visitor’s letter turned out to be a precise replica of our original letter, but since it had been published in a 1930s newspaper and pasted for so long into the bible, it had aged with the book and initially appeared authentic. I brought the visitor into a cell we believe was occupied by Sheares and we stood in silent thought. Mentally checking the date, it suddenly occurred to me that we were present in the very cell where Sheares could have written that letter, 199 years to the day.

A further coincidence involved an original, early 1800s, death mask of Robert Emmet. It was brought in on loan for display in our Emmet Bicentennial Exhibition by a member of the family who currently own it. We unwrapped it and studied it closely; I am strangely in awe of death masks, with their unnerving immediacy. Once again, inexplicably, I experienced that eerie consciousness of an accidental date: it was 26 August, 2003. Exactly two hundred years to the day since Robert Emmet’s actual committal to Kilmainham Prison, after his capture in Harold’s Cross, Dublin. Don’t forget us.

The Kilmainham Collection does contain its own death masks of both Robert Emmet and Wolfe Tone. These would be masks made from masks, but still of sufficient significance to be highly valued. Instead of placing them on permanent display, we commissioned an artist to make replicas of both, which we could then exhibit. The artist seemed rather relieved when he delivered the finished masks. I had to ask why – he replied that he had kept them in his spare room at home. He could have sworn that he could hear them talking to each other at night. Life behind the scenes in a museum!

Issue #94, October 2014

Issue #94, October 2014

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;

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100 Things to Do, the rest of this Month, via Ohio Irish American News

October 17th, 2014

Out & About Ohio October 2014

Brooklyn – Hooley House!
17th- Samantha Fitzpatrick Band, 24th – Faction, 31st – Hooleyween party w Top Dog. 10310 Cascade Crossing, Brooklyn 216-362-7700. 1FunPub.com

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center
18th – Dingle House Party in the Pub w Gerry O’Beirne. 11/1 – Green Tie Affair: Dinner, Music, Dance, Song, Whiskey, Wine tasting and more. Tues: Irish Language Classes / Irish Music Classes, Center Tours, Library open. Thurs: Irish Dance Classes w McGing School of Dance, beginners welcome. Genealogy by appointment. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100, www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

ALL under Cleveland;
17th – walking cane, 18th – fior gael, 22nd -chris & tom, 24th – brent kirby, 25th – chris allen, 29th -lonesome stars. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com
Stone Mad
26th – Chris Allen. Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500
Flat Iron Café
17th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 24th – Cats On Holiday, 31st – Chad Hoffman. 1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216.696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com
Treehouse
820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com

Colin Dusault, @Pj's

Colin Dusault, @Pj’s

PJ McIntyre’s
17th – Colin Dussalt, 18th – Carlos Jones, 24th – Disco Inferno, 25th – Halloween Party w STONE PONY (Springsteen Cover Band) – Cash Prizes for best Costume!!
Check out our Amazing Cavs, Browns Specials as well as our NEW MENU!!!
Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. PJ McIntyre’s is a Local 10 Union establishment. Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.
West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.
Flannery’s Pub
17th & 18th – New Barleycorn, 24th – Bar Flies, 25th – Walking Cane, 31st – Halloween Party. 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side
17th- Club Corned Beef & Cabbage Dinner w No Strangers Here, 18th- Padraic Pearse Reverse Raffle, 24th- Celtic Fright Night w Sumrade $15 w Cash Prizes best costume. 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
Trad Sessiún 3rd Wednesday. 414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
17-19, 24- 26, 31st – [title of show], 18th – Spotlight party. 17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org.
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina
Sully’s
17th – Craic Brothers, 18th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 24th – High Strung Irish, 25th – Sully’s Octoberfest w The Polka Pirates, 26th – Sully’s 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, 31st – Sully’s Halloween Costume Party w The Music Men. 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House
17th – Post Road, 18th – Abbey Rodeo, 24th – Cocktail Johnny, 31st – Hooleyween party w the band Collage. All starts @9:30. Tues: – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Wed: – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great food & live music every Friday in The Pub, 19th – Annual Pig Roast, 24th – Children’s Halloween Party, 19th – Sr. Maureen Burke talk: “Irish Rebels & Heroes in Pre-English Era”. WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Westlake
Hooley House
17th – Matt Johnson’s Piano Fiasco, 24th – School Girl Crush, 31st – Hooleyween Party w Breakfast Club. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. 
1FunPub.com
(440) 835-2890

Warren
Ancient Order of Hibernians Stew Cook Off
18th – Blessed Sacrament Parish Reagan Hall, 3020 Reeves Rd. Warren Ohio. $300 1st place. Food, refreshments, live music by the Lords of Leisure, gift basket raffles. 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.; $6.00, under 12 free.

Willoughby
Mullarkey’s
17th – Mo Andrews, 18th – Dan McCoy, 24th – 107.9 Band, 25th – West Side Steve, 31st – DJ. Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Tara Hall
Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Issue #94, October 2014

Issue #94, October 2014

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;

www.twitter.com/jobjr
www.facebook.com/OhioIrishAmericanNews
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Living with Lardie: A Story from this Months issue of the Ohio Irish American News

October 16th, 2014

Living with Lardie: Halloween’s Coolest Kids
by Richard Lardie

Halloween was a special time to be twelve years old, especially if you lived in Bratenahl. It was like a Norman Rockwell village in the 1950s. Tree lined quiet streets, manicured lawns, mansions, single-family homes and doubles, all combining to make it an idyllic lifestyle. The only flies in the ointment were me and my friend Tony.

Tony and I had been discussing how we could make Halloween really exciting this year. Tony felt everyone always said “trick or treat” but no one ever did any tricks. In Bratenahl all the houses gave great candy or apples or invited us in for cider or cocoa. We never felt good about doing a trick on such great neighbors. We had to come up with something to give meaning to the trick part of that phrase.

I can’t say whose idea it was because when Tony and I were together it was like a third person was making the plans. Ideas just happened and then we acted on them. The idea was to do something that would amaze every other kid in Bratenahl Tony said kids in Bratenahl would talk about this trick for years to come. We would be the coolest kids in the village.

We decided to soap the windows at the Bratenahl police station. Now, anyone could soap the unoccupied part of the station but Tony felt it would only be cool if we soaped the part that had people (Police officers) in it.

Living w Lardie

A little info on the logistics here: the Bratenahl police had two cars at this time. (Two Hudson Hornets to be exact) so we were able to keep track of how many officers were in the building, based on the presence of cars in the drive. Tony was sure both cars would be out patrolling because it was Halloween. He thought one car was probably assigned to find and keep track of him and me while the other was on regular patrol (kind of like man to man coverage on us.)

The police station had a radio room on the southwest corner of the building with a window facing East 105th Street. The radio officer sat in that window facing north and could look out at the street simply by turning his head. This was the window that Tony said needed to be soaped on all four panels for us to go down as the best tricksters in Bratenahl history.

We giggled nervously as we snuck up on the porch of the station. Both cars were gone as Tony had predicted. We could hear the radio voices and static as we made our plans. I would soap the lower two panels because I was shorter while Tony would get the higher panels. So it began.

We slithered down the porch and were now right under the window. The problem was we could not tell when the officer was looking away so we could do our stuff. We slithered back down the porch to make a new plan. Tony said the only way it would work was for one of us to be in a position to watch the officer and tell the other to stand up and soap like crazy. Tony of course volunteered to hide in the bushes and tell me when to soap.

Tony slid off the porch and alongside the building and I scooted back under the window. I could hear the officer giving directions on the radio. Suddenly Tony gave me the signal and I jumped up and soaped the bottom right windowpane. Back down again, my heart was pounding. I looked at Tony. He gave me the wait signal. Then he whispered that he thought the policeman went to the john. I stood up and soaped the other three windows real good. I could hear Tony giggling. Then I heard someone clear their throat. I looked to my right and there was the radio officer looking right at me.

“Hi Dick” He said sternly, “Tony with you?”
“No sir” I said meekly.

“Tony, front and center,” He yelled. Tony came around the corner.
He looked at the soaped windows and told us to follow him. He led us back into the station and straight back to the two cells in the southeast corner of the station. He put us in the cell and closed the door but we both noticed he didn’t lock the cell door. I could see Tony’s eyes go wide as he started planning our escape.

We heard the radio talk as he informed the two cars on patrol that we were in custody. He was laughing with the other officers as he told them what we had been caught doing. Thinking back we were the only interesting things that happened most nights. The chief of police lived across the street from me and one of the sergeants cut my hair every other week. All of the police knew Tony and me by first name.

One of the patrol cars came back so that they could deal with us. The big question was why. Did we think we could do this without getting caught and what would we gain? Tony kept giving me the sign to keep my mouth shut but I have never been good at that. I spilled the beans that we were going to be the coolest kids in the village if we pulled this off.

When we were done we went in and sat in the station with our heads down while they told us what would happen next. They made us wash all the windows while they called our parents. We were glad we decided not to wax the windows. They then brought us in and told us that if we told anyone about this we would be in real trouble. We were forbidden to tell any of our friends what we did. Our parents were free to punish us as they saw fit but if any of this got around then we would be back at the police station for some serious consequences.

We did all that planning and we couldn’t tell anyone. Oh well there was always next Halloween.

I am no longer worried about the serious consequences because Avon Lake does not have an extradition treaty with Bratenahl. That was how Tony and I were almost the COOLEST kids in the Village in 1953.

Issue #94, October 2014

Issue #94, October 2014

Owens Sports; A story from this month’s issue of the Ohio Irish American News: Hurling

October 13th, 2014

Owens Sports
by Mark Owens
Hurling

I recently had the opportunity to watch the game of Hurling with a group of visitors to Cleveland who had only heard of Gaelic Games but had become intrigued by ‘that game you play with a stick’. I spent a good bit of time explaining to them the rules and clarifying that it was in fact a legal game, not the violent sport they thought it might be.

As I spoke, others joined in and were too interested in this ancient game – someone joked I should write about in my column!! So hear you have it, at the request of a mysterious reader a wee piece on Hurling and Camogie (the female version).

Camogie

Camogie

Hurling is believed to be the world’s oldest, and fastest, field game. The game of hurling is unique to Ireland; it has always been a huge part of our culture and heritage and is our national sport. It is featured in Irish folklore to illustrate the deeds of heroic mystical figures and it is chronicled as a distinct Irish pastime for at least 2,000 years. When the Celts came to Ireland as the last ice age was receding, they brought with them a unique culture, their own language, music, script and unique pastimes, including hurling.

Hurling

Hurling

The stick or “hurley” (called camán in Irish) is curved outwards at the end, to provide the striking surface. Hurleys are made of ash wood and are between 30 and 37 inches in length. The part of the hurley used to strike the ball is known as the ‘bas’. The ball in hurling and Camogie is known as a ‘sliothar’ and is similar in size to a hockey ball, but has raised ridges.

Hurling is played on a pitch that can be up to 145m long and 90m long. The goalposts are similar to those used on a rugby pitch, with the crossbar lower than in rugby and slightly higher than in soccer. You may strike the ball on the ground, or in the air.

Unlike hockey, you may pick up the ball with your hurley and carry it for not more than four steps in the hand. After those steps you may bounce the ball on the hurley and back to the hand, but you are forbidden to catch the ball more than twice. To get around this, one of the skills is running with the ball balanced on the hurley.

To score, you put the ball over the crossbar with the hurley for one point, or under the crossbar and into the net by the hurley for a goal, worth three points. Camogie is the female version of hurling.

The sliothar is in play once the referee has given the signal for the game to start or restart. The sliothar will remain in play until the referee signals the game to stop or until the sliothar has passed over any of the boundary lines. The sliothar can be struck with the hurley when it is on the ground, while in the air or when lifted from the hurley. Players may run with the sliotar balanced or hopping on the base of the hurley.

Players can catch the sliothar, play it on their hurley and bring it back to their hands only once. A player can strike the sliotar with the hurley, hand (but not throw it), by kicking and by hitting it from the ground. If the sliothar goes out over the end line off one of the defending players a ’65′ meter free ‘puck’ is awarded in hurling and a ’45′ meter free ‘puck’ is awarded in Camogie.

An attacking player will then take the free puck. If the sliothar goes out of play over the sideline the referee will award a ‘sideline puck’. The player taking the puck must hit the sliothar from the ground. Under no circumstances can the player lift the sliothar on to their hurley.

The referee is assisted by two lines people and four umpires. The referee plays a central role in the game following the play on the pitch, while two umpires take up position at each of the two goals. The lines people follow the game from the sidelines. The referee’s decision is final, but the two lines people and the four umpires may be called upon for additional input into a decision made by the referee.

I recommend you visit the official GAA website www.gaa.ie for more information.

Trivia
Last month’s question: Originally, Ryder Cup competition pitted the USA against representatives from Ireland and Great Britain – at which tournament (year) were golfers from continental Europe included in the team? In 1979 the event was held at the Greenbrier course in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. The first non-Irish/British players to be picked were Seve Ballesteros and Antonio Garrido, both of Spain. The USA won that year 17-11.

This month’s question: The GAA All-Ireland Championship season has come to an end in Ireland; what teams have now won the most (a) All-Ireland Football titles, and (b) All-Ireland Hurling titles?

*Mark Owens is originally from Derry City, Ireland and has resided in the Cleveland area since 2001. Mark is the Director of Marketing for Skylight Financial Group in Cleveland. Send questions, comments or suggestions for future articles to Mark at: markfromderry@gmail.com

Issue #94, October 2014

Issue #94, October 2014

The Master List

October 8th, 2014

Out & About Ohio October 2014

Brooklyn – Hooley House!
10th – Charlie in the Box, 17th- Samantha Fitzpatrick Band, 24th – Faction, 31st – Hooleyween party w Top Dog. 10310 Cascade Crossing, Brooklyn 216-362-7700. 1FunPub.com

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center
16th – Irish Pub Night w Mick & Friends, 18th – Dingle House Party in the Pub w Gerry O’Beirne. 11/1 – Green Tie Affair: Dinner, Music, Dance, Song, Whiskey, Wine tasting and more. Tues: Irish Language Classes / Irish Music Classes, Center Tours, Library open. Thurs: Irish Dance Classes w McGing School of Dance, beginners welcome. Genealogy by appointment. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100, www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

The Harp
8th – chris & tom, 10th – pitch the peat, 11th – kristine Jackson, 15th – lonesome stars, 17th – walking cane, 18th – fior gael, 22nd -chris & tom, 24th – brent kirby, 25th – chris allen, 29th -lonesome stars. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com

Stone Mad
12th – Annual Clam Bake w Marys Lane, 26th – Chris Allen. Live music entertainment every Sunday. Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500

Flat Iron Café
10th – Jim & Eroc Classic Rock Duo, 17th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 24th – Cats On Holiday, 31st – Chad Hoffman. 1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216.696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com

Treehouse
820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com

17th - Colin Dussalt at Pj McIntyre's

Colin Dusault: 3rd – Hooley House Westlake, 17th – Pj McIntyre’s

PJ McIntyre’s
10th – Time Warp, 11th – Ace Molar, 14th – IRISH LANGUAGE CLASS contact jobrien@ianohio.com, 15th – Old Time Music Jam Session, 16th – Craic Brothers, 17th – Colin Dussalt, 18th – Carlos Jones, 24th – Disco Inferno, 25th – Halloween Party w STONE PONY (Springsteen Cover Band) – Cash Prizes for best Costume!! Check out our Amazing Cavs, Browns Specials as well as our NEW MENU!!!
Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. NEW CRAFT BEER REFRIGERATOR. PJ McIntyre’s is a Local 10 Union establishment. Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book all your parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.

West Park Station
‘Merican Mondays & Trivia Night 7pm. Tues: Roll Call-discounted drinks for all Fire, Police, Military & Med Professionals 9pm. Wed: Karaoke 10pm. Thur: Girl’s Night 10pm. Sun: SIN Night 9pm. 17015 Lorain Avenue Cleveland 44111 www.westparkstation.com. (216) 476-2000.

Flannery’s Pub
10th – Bar Flies, 11th – Brent Kirby, 17th & 18th – New Barleycorn, 24th – Bar Flies, 25th – Walking Cane, 31st – Halloween Party. 323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com
***

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side
10th – Shifty Drifters, 10th- Traditional Ceili dance & music w the Portersharks $10 @door All welcome! 17th- Club Corned Beef & Cabbage Dinner w No Strangers Here, 18th- Padraic Pearse Reverse Raffle, 24th- Celtic Fright Night w Sumrade $15 w Cash Prizes best costume. 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.irishamericanclubeastside.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
Trad Sessiún 3rd Wednesday. 414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Beck Center for the Arts
10 – 12 – Forever Plaid; 10 – 12, 17-19, 24- 26, 31st – [title of show], 18th – Spotlight party. 17801 Detroit Avenue Lakewood 44107 (216) 521-2540 www.beckcenter.org.
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

26th - Sully's 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, plus Haloween events all weekend

26th – Sully’s 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, plus Haloween events all weekend

Medina
Sully’s
10th – Marys Lane, 11th – New Barleycorn, 17th – Craic Brothers, 18th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 24th – High Strung Irish, 25th – Sully’s Octoberfest w The Polka Pirates, 26th – Sully’s 3rd Annual Irish Wake w New Barleycorn, 31st – Sully’s Halloween Costume Party w The Music Men. 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com

Mentor
Hooley House
10th – Carlos Jones & the PLUS band, 17th – Post Road, 18th – Abbey Rodeo, 24th – Cocktail Johnny, 31st – Hooleyween party w the band Collage. All starts @9:30. Tues: – Open Mic w Nick Zuber, Wed: – Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
Great food & live music every Friday in The Pub. 10th – Annual Ladies Reverse Raffle, 11th – Waking Ned Devine movie, 19th – Annual Pig Roast, 24th – Children’s Halloween Party, 19th – Sr. Maureen Burke talk: “Irish Rebels & Heroes in Pre-English Era”. WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Westlake
Hooley House
10th – Top Dog, 17th – Matt Johnson’s Piano Fiasco, 24th – School Girl Crush, 31st – Hooleyween Party w Breakfast Club. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. 
1FunPub.com
(440) 835-2890

Warren
Ancient Order of Hibernians Stew Cook Off
18th – Blessed Sacrament Parish Reagan Hall, 3020 Reeves Rd. Warren Ohio. $300 1st place. Food, refreshments, live music by the Lords of Leisure, gift basket raffles. 5 p.m. – 10 p.m.; $6.00, under 12 free.

Willoughby
Mullarkey’s
11th – Hardcore Troubadors, 17th – Mo Andrews, 18th – Dan McCoy, 24th – 107.9 Band, 25th – West Side Steve, 31st – DJ. Wed: Karaoke, Thurs: Ladies Night w/ D.J. 4110 Erie Street www.mullarkeys.com

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Tara Hall
Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. No Cover. Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Croagh Patrick’s – 2nd Tuesday of every month 8 – 10pm
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Irish Eyes Heavenly Pub, 1st Wednesday of month. 3324 Secor Rd, Toledo
Stone Mad – 1st Sunday of the month Holleran Traditional Irish Session, 7pm
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Claddagh Irish Pub – Sundays 6:00pm-9:00pm. All experience levels welcome
o 585 S. Front St. Columbus, Ohio 43215
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Issue #94, October 2014

Issue #94, October 2014

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
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Editor’s Corner ~ We live in the shelter of each other

September 28th, 2014

Editor’s Corner

Ar sca’tha che’ile amhaireann na daoine
- We live in the shelter of each other.

We talk about paying it forward, maybe, maybe too much, tho they say, you can never have too much of a good thing. But a watered seed must grow. Singer Frances Black is known throughout the world for her gorgeous voice, and her music. But, her legacy is being written day by day, through her work as Founder and Executive Director of The Rise Foundation.

Frances Black

Frances Black

The RISE Foundation is a registered charity founded by Frances Black in 2009, focused on family members of those with addictive behavior. RISE (Recovery In a Safe Environment) is dedicated to helping family members to free themselves from the stress, anxiety and worry of having a loved one with addictive behavior, and to understand the nature of addiction and the profound effects it has on relationships.

I am proud to be a founding member and board member of Friends of Rise – Ireland, Inc. I look forward to following Frances’ lead, and, most of all, to offer a helping hand. We’re working to build another RISE Foundation Home in Ireland, and you can help. See the flyer within, and #openyourheart.

#openyourheart RISE Foundation

#openyourheart RISE Foundation

Cead Mile Failte – probably the Irish word or phrase I am most often asked to translate – it means 100,000 Welcomes – it is the beauty of a people, and the backbone of a whole tourism industry. But it doesn’t begin to explain or explore the beauty that is the Irish language. It is a tough language to master, but often the obstacle is merely lack of opportunity.

So, in that light, the Ohio Irish American News is proud to partner with Pj McIntyre’s and owner Pat Campbell to offer you the opportunity to learn the language of the Irish. Irish language classes start October 14th and run every Tuesday thru December 16 in PJ’s Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room.

Got Irish?  Wanna learn?

Got Irish? Wanna learn?

The flyer detailing the class is within, but for 10 weeks, we will struggle together, to speak as our Irish cousins do; with a lilt and laughter, the struggle becomes light. Classes start at 6:30 and go to about 8. The option of dinner at 5:30 for those willing, at your own expense, with a few guest speakers or fun add-ins at ours, will add to the experience.
Our goal is this Intro class for the fall, then a Next Level class for those who wish to continue, starting in January. With our friends Francis McGarry and the Irish American Club East Side, Inc, we hope to build an Irish speaking community in Cleveland over the next few years, and ever onward.

Sure it’s a tough road to hoe, so we better get started. To register, send a check for $120 to (and made out to): Ohio Irish American News 14615 Triskett Road, Cleveland, OH 44111-3123. Registrations MUST be in advance and are open only until the class is filled. We’ll pay it forward, with your help.

Give me your stories, give me your words; poets that I love and things that I have heard. Things we’ve forgotten, or maybe never knew; Ireland’s color, is really blue.

We keep growing, so we are delighted to lighten the load with a new columnist. Please welcome Richard Lardie (Living with Lardie). A little laughter and a load of wonder keep replenishing the endless riches we offer within. Submissions are welcome and we have the opportunity to become a columnist as well.

The summer has slipped away, tho the festival season was mighty. Gifts and giving, ice buckets and rain buckets, LeBron and Johnny Football, thoughts of fall, Thanksgiving and Christmas … it all fits.

Slán,
John


Get Up; Show Up; Lift Up

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
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***

Milestones:

Congratulations to Sean Lackey and the cast and crew of The Yank!! The Yank is an official 2014 selection of The FirstGlance Film Festivals (Hollywood, Philadelphia)! 
This is a significant milestone for The Yank as over 90% of feature films acquire distribution after screening at FirstGlance Film Fests!

Issue #94, October 2014

Issue #94, October 2014

Illuminations: The Republic of Ireland: A Story from this month’s issue of the Ohio Irish American News

September 23rd, 2014

Illuminations: The Republic of Ireland: A Story from this month’s issue of the Ohio Irish American News
By: J. Michael Finn

Establishing Ireland as a republic and separating the country from English rule was the goal of the 1916 Easter Rising. At the beginning of the Rising, the Irish Republic was proudly declared from the front of the General Post Office by Patrick H. Pearse, leader of the Rising. It would take another thirty-three years before republic status was achieved. This year we commemorate the 65th Anniversary of the Irish Republic.

The 1916 Rising was not successful, its leaders were executed and hopes of a republic were dashed. New leaders emerged from the ashes of the Rising, who attempted to bring about republic status. With the subsequent Irish War of Independence, republican hopes were again raised as the new leaders brought the British to the conference table. Although Michael Collins, the leader of the Irish delegation that negotiated the 1921 Anglo-Irish Treaty, saw it as a stepping-stone to an eventual republic, the ratification of the treaty began a bitter Civil War.

Under the Treaty, as the Irish Free State, Ireland achieved only Dominion status within the British Commonwealth, which left the Irish relatively free from direct interference, but the British monarch, as King of Ireland, continued to be the head of state. The 1921 Treaty also reinforced the separation of the six-county statelet of Northern Ireland, which remained connected to England under the 1800 Act of Union and the 1920 Government of Ireland Act.

Eamon de Valera, who had boycotted the Free State over the terms of the 1921 treaty, came back into the government in 1927. Upon becoming President of the Executive Council of the Free State in 1932 he began a process of systemically dismantling various parts of the 1922 Treaty (in his way, implementing the Michael Collins vision of stepping-stones).

By 1936 his systematic attempts to remove references to the British monarch from Irish constitutional law meant that the only functions remaining to the King were: 1) signing Letters of Credence accrediting Irish ambassadors to other states; and 2) signing international treaties on Ireland’s behalf.

In 1936 de Valara used the abdication of King Edward VIII as an opportunity to remove all explicit mention of the British monarch from the constitution of the Irish Free State. Soon after this he began the drafting of a new constitution for Ireland. This new constitution came into force on December 29, 1937 following a national vote held on July 1, 1937.

De Valera’s constitution recognized the entire island as Ireland (in Irish as Éire), intentionally choosing to ignore the separate status of Northern Ireland. The new constitution also added the position of President (in Irish, Uachtarán na hÉireann). This position replaced the old Governor-General, who was the resident representative of the Crown under the Free State.

During World War II, Ireland remained neutral and de Valera as Taoiseach held off the forces of the Allied Powers who pressured him to abandon his neutral status. In 1945 de Valera was asked if he intended to declare Ireland a republic. He replied “We are a republic.” After the war the status quo remained, with Ireland participating little in the British Commonwealth, and with de Valera still operating under the 1937 constitution.

The bill to declare Ireland a republic was introduced to the Irish Oireachtas (Legislature) in 1948 by the new Taoiseach John A. Costello of the Fine Gael party. Costello made the announcement that the bill was to be introduced when he was in Ottawa, Canada, during an official visit to that country.

 

Illuminations John A Costello
Historians have suggested that the announcement was a spur of the moment reaction to an offense caused by the Governor-General of Canada, Lord Alexander, who was of Northern Irish descent. Alexander allegedly placed Northern Irish symbols, notably a replica of the famous Roaring Meg cannon used in the Siege of Derry, before an insulted Costello at a state dinner.

In addition, Canada broke an agreement that there would be separate toasts for the King and for the President of Ireland. The Irish position was that a toast to the King would not include Ireland. At the dinner only a toast to the King was offered, to the fury of Costello and the Irish delegation. After the dinner Costello announced his plan to declare Ireland a republic.

The subsequent Irish legislation, the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 provided for the abolition of the last remaining functions of the King in relation to Ireland and provided that the President of Ireland may instead exercise these functions in the King’s place. When the bill was introduced by Costello, he said, “This Bill will end, and end forever, in a simple, clear and unequivocal way this country’s long and tragic association with the institution of the British Crown and will make it manifest beyond equivocation or subtlety that the national and international status of this country is that of an independent republic.” The bill was approved unanimously by the Oireachtas.

When the Act came into force on April 18, 1949 (Easter Monday, in commemoration of 1916), it effectively ended Ireland’s status as a British dominion. It also ended Ireland’s membership of the British Commonwealth of Nations. In response to the Irish action, the Ireland Act 1949 was passed by the British Parliament and was intended to deal with the consequences of the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 as passed by the Oireachtas.

The British act created outrage in Ireland because one of its provisions guaranteed that partition of the six counties would continue unless the Parliament of Northern Ireland chose otherwise. Because Northern Ireland had a unionist majority, this guaranteed that Northern Ireland would remain part of the UK unless the Belfast parliament resolved otherwise fastened the so-called “unionist veto” in British law (remember that partitioning was widely touted as only a “temporary” measure).

The Irish parliament called for a Protest Against Partition. This was the first and last cross-party declaration against partition by the Oireachtas. The revival of an Irish Republican Army in the early 1950s has been attributed to the strength of popular feeling among nationalists on both sides of the border against the Ireland Act. The Good Friday Agreement 1998 altered this act, and the dissolution of Northern Ireland is now linked to a vote of the people of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

The Republic of Ireland became a member of the United Nations in December 1955, after previously being denied membership due to its neutral stance during the WWII.

While republic status for Ireland was a great achievement for all parties and a necessary move to separate it from the British crown, it left open the status of Northern Ireland. Subsequent agreements (the Downing Street Declarations and the Good Friday Agreement) have made progress to further defining the role of the 26-county Republic in the partitioning. The issue of the remaining 6-counties of Ireland has yet to be fully resolved. Unification of Ireland would be the next major and logical step in the process.

*J. Michael Finn is the Ohio State Historian for the Ancient Order of Hibernians and Division Historian for the Patrick Pearse Division in Columbus, Ohio. He is also Chairman of the Catholic Record Society for the Diocese of Columbus, Ohio. He writes on Irish and Irish-American history; Ohio history and Ohio Catholic history. You may contact him at FCoolavin@aol.com.

Issue #93; September 2014, featuring The Queen, and The High Kings

Issue #93; September 2014, featuring The Queen, and The High Kings

What’s going on? 23 Things to do this weekend

September 19th, 2014

What’s going on this Weekend: From your Ohio Irish American News

Friday 9/19

Collage The Hooley House – Brooklyn
PitchthePeat The Harp
Donal OShaughnessy Flat Iron Cafe
CraicBros Pj McIntyre’s
The New Barleycorn Flannery’s Pub
SomethingDada Beck Center for the Arts
Samantha Fitzpatrick Hooley House – Mentor
MattJohnsonFiasco The Hooley House – Westlake
Chris Allen JamNite Stampers Bar

Saturday 9/20

Loads of ½ Way parties, including:
Croagh Patricks The Twisted Paddy & Wild Goose Wlby w LiveMusic& TaxiBetweenthe3Bars / @ all 3 Hooley Houses and PJ McIntyres Irish Pub

Kristine Jackson @Stampers
FiorGael @TheHarp
AbbeyNormal @PjMcIntyre’s
LonesomeMeadows Logan’s Irish Pub
@NewBarleycorn @Flannery’s
DonalOIrish Songs – Donal O’Shaughnessy Sully’s Irish Pub
DanMcCoy John Mullarkey’s

Sunday 9/21

GAA All-Ireland: GaelicFootball @PjMcIntyres 8:15 Minors Championship Final KerryVsDonegal/ 10:30 am All-Ireland Sr Football Final KerryVsDonegal

BeckyBoyd Treehouse Bar
SomethingDada @BeckCenter

Add Yours: If you don’t send em, we can’t print em!

Issue #93; September 2014, featuring The Queen, and The High Kings

Issue #93; September 2014, featuring The Queen, and The High Kings

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
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www.twitter.com/jobjr
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