What is Social Media and Why Does it Matter to the Ohio Irish American News, and to you?

May 5th, 2016

Editor’s Corner
by John O’Brien, Jr.

Social Media can no longer be called new. It is vital, but not new.  Twitter just celebrated their 10th Anniversary on March 21st, 2006; Facebook preceded them, on February 4th, 2004. Small companies like ours have to find other ways to share our stories. There is the financial reason of course, but far deeper, is reach – reach is everything in publishing, and in advertising.

Social Media has been a Godsend for us, to meet our mission of seeding and promoting people, events, causes and concerns, all on a shoe-string budget, dedicated to being the gardner.  Preserving, presenting and promoting our rich Irish heritage is our passion and our fulfillment.  Through our many platforms of print, webpage, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat accounts, we reach and share with an additional 20,000 people each and every month.  In March and December, it is more than 50,000, above and beyond those who read and share our print edition at home and work.

Too many people listen to reply. Listen to understand. We can spray and pray, that someone will see our posts, react to them, and then heed the call to action by liking, sharing and most importantly, attending. But we’d rather have you as part of our army.

2 Edit Corner key2 sm bubbles

Think of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Snapchat as ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox – We know each has followers and fans. Who is the audience on each platform?  They overlap, but don’t they have very distinctive audiences? What is their need? And how do you fulfill it? It is different for each network; it is different for each platform.

Did you know when you share someone’s post, the number of eyes that see it is 10x what it reaches with no shares, and that number increases at even greater proportions, as the number of shares and likes, activates another level in sheer numbers of people who see your post? What does that mean?

1 edit corner cool keyboard SM icons

The number of people who see your post is determined by rules written by Facebook, often called algorithms.  More of your audience sees your post every time a reader shares it to their own followers, so a good post gets a double bonus. Facebook is set up for popular posts to be shown to more people; unpopular ones die a quick death.
3 edit corner dislike

Only 13% of your “followers”, people who have liked your page, actually see your posts, unless they have clicked a button, called ‘subscribe”, which makes sure they see ALL your posts.  This is how Facebook convinces you to buy ads on their site – more people will see your posts when you advertise than when you don’t. As people react to your posts or tweets, the percent of your followers who see it rises, dramatically. If you include an image, the eyes on you multiplies by 3-4 times.

Put feet to your faith, whether it be support for your business, your passion, your spiritual beliefs, your charity or your music. Be verbal, but be physical too – Get up; Lift up; and Show up. And then live it all over again, on Facebook. If you want to give a hand to a friend, share.

Go dtí an mhí seo chugainn, slán a fhágáil

(Until next month, goodbye)

John

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
O’Bent Enterprises includes:
www.twitter.com/jobjr
www.instagram.com/LiveMoreLife
www.facebook.com/OhioIrishAmericanNews
www.linkedin.com/in/jobjr
http://songsandstories.net/myblog/feed/

ianohio_0516-3

May issue of the Ohio Irish American News. Cover features Andrew Fowler, Pipe Instructor, West Side Irish American Club Pipe Band. Photo by John O'Brien, Jr.

May issue of the Ohio Irish American News. Cover features Andrew Fowler, Pipe Instructor, West Side Irish American Club Pipe Band. Photo by John O’Brien, Jr.

This is no April Fools – there is a LOT going on this weekend

April 9th, 2016

Out & About Ohio April 2016

LAST CALL! Flanagan’s Wake to end this month!
The Hilarious Interactive Irish Wake is Every Friday & Saturday at 8pm and Kennedy’s Theatre at Playhouse Square, Downtown Cleveland. 216-241-6000 or 866-546-1353 www.playhousesquare.org

Brooklyn – Hooley House!
1 – School Girl Crush, 8 – Abby Normal, 22 – The Fabulous Grungetones. Wed: Pub Trivia. 10310 Cascade Crossing, Brooklyn 216-362-7700. 1FunPub.com

Cincinnati – Irish Heritage Center
4th – Reds Parade Day w Ohio Rose of Tralee Kathleen Rose O’Donnell, 7th – Irish Pub Night 7:00, 9th – The John Byrne Band Concert, 21st – Irish Pub Night w Mick & Friends, 24th – 100th Anniversary Easter Rising 1:00 Laying Memorial wreath @”An Gorta Mor” at Sawyer Point, 1:15 Soup & Soda Bread @ Irish Heritage Center, 2:30 Easter Rising 1916. Irish Teas/Library /Genealogy Detective/ all three by appointment. Irish Heritage Center 3905 Eastern Avenue 513.533.0100. www.irishcenterofcincinnati.com.

ALL under Cleveland;
The Harp
1st – Traditional Irish Session, 2nd – The Porter Sharks, 6th – Lonesome Stars, 8th – Crawley, Custy & Taylor, 9th – Webster, Carr & Custy, 13th – Chris & Tom, 15th – Fior Gael, 16th – Chris Allen, 18th – Support our music variance @ Board of Zoning 9:30am Cleveland City Hall Room 514. 20th – Lonesome Stars, 22nd – Bill Fox, 23rd – Brent Kirby, 27th -Chris & Tom, 29th – The Kilroy’s. 4408 Detroit Road, 44113 www.the-harp.com
Stone Mad
Traditional Irish Session 1st Sunday of ea/month, Happy Hour Monday-Friday 4 to 7. 1306 West 65th Street Cleveland 44102 216-281-6500
Flat Iron Café
1114 Center St. Cleveland 44113-2406 216. 696.6968. www.flatironcafe.com
Treehouse
3rd- Michael Crawley, 10th- Chris Allen, 17th- Becky Boyd, 24th- Tom Evanchuck. 820 College Avenue, Cleveland, 44113 www.treehousecleveland.com
PJ McIntyre’s
1st – Cats On Holiday, 2nd – Iced Cherry, 5th – Monthly Pub Quiz- w Mike D. 7pm. 8th – Craic Brothers, 9th – Disco Inferno, 15th – Marys Lane, 16th – Stone Pony, 22nd – Big Ship, 23rd – Bluestone Union, 29th – Michael Crawley & Brent Hopper Happy Hour Duo 5-8, then Juice After, 30th – The Westies. Don’t forget T-Shirt Tues: wear any PJs T-Shirt get 15% off bill! Whiskey Wed: ½ off every whiskey in the house. Thurs – Craft Beer $2.50. PJ McIntyre’s is a Local 10 Union establishment. Home of the Celtic Supporter’s Club and the GAA. Book Parties & Events in our Bridgie Ned’s Irish Parlor Party Room. 17119 Lorain Road, 44111. www.pjmcintyres.com 216-941-9311.
Music Box Supper Club
3rd – Ballinloch, 17th – Portersharks, 22nd – Alan Doyle, 24th Brittany Reilly & Achill Sound. 1148 Main Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44113. http://www.musicboxcle.com
Flannery’s Pub
323 East Prospect, Cleveland 44115 216.781.7782 www.flannerys.com

April 2016 Easter Rising Commemoration

April 2016 Easter Rising Commemoration

Avon Lake
Ahern Banquet Center
Ahern Banquet Center is booking weddings and special events. Call Tony Ahern / Lucy Balser @ 440-933-9500. 726 Avon Belden Rd, Avon Lake 44012. www.aherncatering.com

Euclid
Irish American Club East Side
1 – Bog Trotters, 15 – Mad Macs, 17 – Padraic Pearse Ladies Reverse Raffle, 22 – 1916 Easter Rising Commemoration. PUB: 7:30 – 10:30. IACES 22770 Lake Shore Blvd. Euclid, 44123. 216.731.4003 www.eastsideirish.org

Findlay
Logan’s Irish Pub
Trad Sessiún 3rd Wednesday. 414 South Main Street, Findlay 45840 419.420.3602 www.logansirishpubfindlay.com

Lakewood
Plank Road Tavern
Open Sessiún Every Thursday 7 – 10. $3 Guinness and Jamieson. 16719 Detroit Avenue, 44107

Medina / Montrose
Sully’s
1st – Marys Lane, 2nd – New Barleycorn, 8th – One – A U2 Tribute Band, 9th – Donal O’Shaughnessy, 15th – Craic Brothers, 16th – Dulahan, 22 – - Island Doctor, 23rd – Music Men, 29 – - Brittany Reilly & Achill Crossing, 30th – Big Mike & Company. Come celebrate our 8th Anniversary on April 2nd with the New Barleycorn! 117 West Liberty Medina, 44256 www.sullysmedina.com.
Hooley House Montrose
1 – Festivus, 15 – Almost famous, 22 – Sunset Strip, 29 – Michelle Romary Band, Wed: Pub Trivia. 145 Montrose West Avenue Copley, Oh 44321 (234) 466-0060 www.1funpub.com

Mentor
Hooley House
1 –Collage, 8 – London Flatts, 15 – Faction, 23 – Abbey Rodeo, 29 – Almost Famous. Wed: Trivia Night. 7861 Reynolds Rd Mentor www.1funpub.com (440) 942-6611.

Olmsted Twp
West Side Irish American Club
16th – Wine Tasting, 23rd – 1916 Easter Rising Centennial Celebration, 24th – Annual Style Show & Luncheon. Great live music & food in The Pub every Friday. WSIA Club 8559 Jennings Rd. 44138 www.wsia-club.org. 440-235-5868.

Valley City
Gandalf’s
9th – Sarena Tamboritza Orchestra, 16th – Marty Scionka. Join us for Brunch EVERY SUNDAY. Great food, atmosphere, staff and fun. 6757 Center Road Valley City, 44280 www.gandalfspub.com.

Westlake
Hooley House
1 – Michelle Romary Band, 8 – New Barleycorn, 9 – Post Road, 15 – London Flatts, 22 – School Girl crush, 29 – Faction. Wed: Pub Trivia. 24940 Sperry Dr Westlake 44145. www.1FunPub.com (440) 835-2890

Columbus
Shamrock Club Events
2nd – Central Ohio Folk Festival, 3rd – General Meeting, 9th – Singer/Songwriters Showcase, 16th – Easter Rising Concert, 17th – Athletic Awards Presentation, 17th General Meeting and Officer Elections, 23rd – Ladies of Longford, 30th – New Officer’s Installation Banquet, 30th – Homeland. Happy Hour every Friday from 5-7pm! 60 W. Castle Rd. Columbus 43207 614-491-4449 www.shamrockclubofcolumbus.com
Columbus GAA
9th – Hosting Men’s Tri-State Invitational w Cincinnati, Indianapolis & Louisville. Columbus GAA will debut their new kits! All are encouraged to come out and enjoy some great games, drinks and fun! Call for female Gaelic Football players! Contact w interest/questions. www.columbusgaa.com.
Tara Hall
Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. No Cover. Tara Hall 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

Traditional Irish Social Dancing
Sunday Ceili’s at the Music Box, April 17, May 8, 15, 4-7 pm, FREE
Set dancing lessons, Tuesdays 8-10 pm, St. Clarence Church, North Olmsted
Wednesdays 7-9 pm, Irish American Club – East Side
Ceili dancing lessons, Thursdays, April 7, 14, 28, 7-9 pm, West Side Irish American Club
Coming on May 22–1916 Commemorative Ceili, West Side Irish American Club, 4-8 pm
For more information, contact CeiliClubCleveland@gmail.com or find us on Facebook

ianohio_0416_28_pages_page25 ianohio_0416_28_pages_page24

Ongoing Traditional Irish Sessiúns – Bring your instruments and play along!
• Akron Hibernian’s Ceili Band Sessions, Wednesdays 7:30 pm. Mark Heffernan Div 2 Hall 2000 Brown St, Akron 330-724-2083. Beginner to intermediate
• Bardic Circle @The Shamrock Club of Columbus Beginner – friendly, intermediate level Irish session meeting every other Thursdays 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
• Briquette’s – 1st Saturday of the month, 4-6 pm. Ashtabula on the Harbor
• The Harp – 1st Friday of every month, 9pm. 4408 Detroit, Cleveland
• Logan’s Irish Pub – 3rd Wednesday of the month, 414 S. Main St., Findlay, 7:30 pm
• Oberlin’s Traditional Irish Session – 2nd Monday of the month 7 – 9 Slow Train Café, 55 East College St., Oberlin. Informal all experience welcome: www.oberlin.net/~irishsession
• Plank Road – Every Thursday 7 – 10. All ages and experience welcome. 16719 Detroit Road, Lakewood, 44107
• Tara Hall -Traditional Irish music w General Guinness Band & Friends 2nd Friday 8:00 – 11:00pm. 274 E. Innis Ave. Columbus, 43207 614.444.5949.

ianohio_0416_28_pages_page25

I ain’t Mad, How Much March Madness Was in Your March?

March 26th, 2016

I ain’t Mad! Editor’s Corner

How mad was the March madness in your March? Mine was mighty, warm and filled with faith, friends and family. I am an active advocate of telling people you love them, how much you appreciate them, while they are still here to hear it. We too often don’t take the time, until after time has already run out.

Many St. Pat’s Honorees got to hear how much they are loved last month, during all the parade and surrounding activities. I love hearing their stories, preferably first hand. I like watching older folks unobserved, to see the light in their eyes, what stirs them. I wonder what they have seen, what they are remembering, and how to connect with them, so they will share with me.

As I get older, wisdom, perhaps, allows me to see the tragedy in her story, the hurt and the beauty in his eyes, behind the shining. The beauty in a person or a people is readily evident, despite instant gratification impulses. Gotta let it steep; gotta let them know.

April 2016, Editor's Corner

April 2016, Editor’s Corner

One of my favorite people is Pulitzer Prize winning author and columnist Regina Brett. She writes with and of common sense, caring, leaving the judgement at the door in a life well-lived and the lessons learned. She says in her book, God Never Blinks, “People don’t want to be saved; they want to be loved; that is how you save them.”

We could all use a little saving I suppose. In turbulent times, Demons draft with glee. But a little love leaves a long legacy. Sometimes, people just need a break. Surely tomorrow, that extra bit of time you gave today won’t be missed by you. But for them, it will be life changing.

St. Patrick’s Day, like Christmas, or Thanksgiving, or perhaps too, the festivals, slows things down enough for us to see the gathered gifts we have gotten, the graces and breaks we have received. To those that paved the path, that planted seeds or nurtured their growing, to those who received the honors and the appreciation, and those who did it without any recognition at all, I wish to say, Thank you.

The Easter Rising Commemorations are in full swing. Many events are listed within. Commemoration is important, to not only say thanks, but to learn or remember; who we are is not limited by from where we came, but it is certainly influenced by it. Knowledge is power and there is power in remembering, and saying Thanks.

Go dtí an mhí seo chugainn, slán a fhágáil
(Until next month, goodbye)
John

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
O’Bent Enterprises includes:
www.twitter.com/jobjr
www.facebook.com/OhioIrishAmericanNews
www.linkedin.com/in/jobjr/ http://songsandstories.net/myblog/feed/
***

Milestones:

Our condolences to Paul and Peggy Baker, on the loss of Paul’s mom on Friday March 11th. Our thoughts and prayers are with you and your families.

Congratulations to: The Ladies Ancient Order of Hibernians Irish history contest year focused on the women’s’ involvement in the Easter Rising. The winners of are:
Level 1: 1st place – Ashlyn Garthwaite; 2nd place – Brigid Donnelly; 3rd place – Brian Royea. Level 2: 1st place – Morgen Donnelly; 2nd place – Liam Craig; 3rd place – Delia Lowry. Honorable Mention – Sophia Murphy

Congratulations to Writer and Director Sean Lackey, whose movie, ‘The Yank‘, a romantic comedy about a clueless four-generations Irish descendant returning to Ireland for the wedding of his friend, will be now available in DVD & VOD by Vision Films.

Congratulations to Katherine Boyd, named Host on the Morning Edition, WCPN Ideastream’s 90.3.

April 2016 Easter Rising Commemoration

April 2016 Easter Rising Commemoration

How Do You Celebrate St. Pat’s?

March 13th, 2016

Editor’s Corner

How do you celebrate? I start out with my family, and my extended loving family, the West Side Irish American Club, with the annual mass at St. Colman’s, whose gorgeous marble, and design, commissioned to Irish men in Dublin, I appreciate more and more each year; I may be daydreaming, but ghosts seep out of the marble for me. Then it is off to this year’s 149th Annual Cleveland St. Patrick’s Day Parade. I walk with the Sheriff’s Dept. at the front of the parade, then circle around and march with the WSIA family, again.

I absolutely love it. The massive crowds are awesome to see, a culture like no other, one that invites all cultures to join us as we celebrate roots, family, and a passionate heritage that touches every curve and corner of the globe, through our own hard work, perseverance, and passion for freedom, in so many forms.

After walking the parade, we walk to a local hotel, and eat, drink and make merry, as outside our walls, downtown clears out. A few other parties and must go to appearances fill out the day, until we all reassemble at the Folks, for dinner, stories and as many cups of tea as your nerves can handle.

#LiveMoreLifeBeMoreIrish is my personal social media tag line and has been my credo for as long as I can remember; it is a life urgency instilled by my father, to make a difference as you trade each day of your life, for something; let it be worthwhile. You can find that same credo throughout the Irish community; it translates to any culture. Be aware, be awed and be grateful.

There is much to do this month; of course musical and event lists and labels run rampant in this issue. Deliberate, and then deliberately, pick your passion; pick your company, and Live More Life, as the Irish are wont to do.

We would love to hear and share how you celebrate – send me a note (jobrien@ianohio.com) or post on our FB page. Pics are welcome, as long as you own them. Follow our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages listed below and Opt-in to our Cleveland Irish Fest (clevelandirish.org) and Ohio Irish American News (ianohio.com) occasionally and respectfully sent and guarded email list, and win prizes like fest tickets, an annual OhIAN subscription, books or CD’s. We will run favorites in our April issue; share your memories, share your milestones, share all that being Irish, means to you.

ianohio_0316_40_pages_page3

Go dtí an mhí seo chugainn, slán a fhágáil
(Until next month, goodbye)
John

ianohio_0316_40_pages_page1

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
O’Bent Enterprises includes:
www.twitter.com/jobjr
www.facebook.com/OhioIrishAmericanNews
www.facebook.com/ClevelandIrishCulturalFestival
www.ianohio.com
www.clevelandirish.org
www.linkedin.com/jobjr/

http://songsandstories.net/myblog/feed/

www.instagram.com/LiveMoreLife

Who Was St. Patrick?

March 13th, 2016

Who Was St. Patrick?

Patrick wasn’t Irish, yet America’s biggest Irish celebration is held in his name; he wasn’t the first bishop sent to Ireland, yet he is responsible for launching the evangelical push that converted the pagan Irish to Christianity. He never drove the snakes out of Ireland – there weren’t any, at least not in the literal sense.

St. Patrick is one of three patron saints of Ireland (the other two are Brigid and Columba). He was born in the late 4th century, most sources say 387, somewhere on the coast of Britain, perhaps in Wales or Scotland. As early as 431, Pope Celestine sent a bishop named Palladius to minister to the Christians in Ireland. Patrick came to Ireland when he was sixteen, but he came against his will, as a slave.

Fortunately, we have his own words left to us in the form of his autobiography, referred to as his Confessio, and his Epistola, an admonition of British mistreatment of Irish Christians.

StPatrick
Patrick was kidnapped by Irish raiders who were searching for slave labor, a common practice in those days. He worked for six years as a shepherd, and in those lonely times, as he later explained in his Confessio, he began to pray in earnest and trust God. He escaped and made his way back to his homeland.

Later he became a bishop and had a dream or a vision in which he heard the voice of the Irish calling to him to come and walk again among them. He did return, and apparently had several run-ins with pagan kings. Patrick stood up for his beliefs and was instrumental in guiding the Irish people to Christ. His predecessor, who was probably already in the country when Patrick returned, had been sent to minister to people who already believed; Patrick ministered to the unbelievers.

Did Patrick convert all of Ireland? That would have been a near impossible task in one man’s lifetime, especially since it was done without warfare, unlike Europe during the Crusades. Others came after him and carried on his work in Ireland and beyond: Brigid, Columba, Brendan, Aidan, and Columban to name a few. But St. Patrick is the name today that identifies all things Irish. The holiday is no longer just a religious observance; it is a day of cultural pride for all those with Irish blood.

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
www.twitter.com/jobjr
www.facebook.com/OhioIrishAmericanNews
www.linkedin.com/in/jobjr/
http://songsandstories.net/myblog/feed/ www.instagram.com/LiveMoreLife

Irish Symbols and things to know for St. Pat’s

March 13th, 2016

The Irish Sweater:

The ubiquitous Irish sweater. On St. Patrick’s Day, it seems as though everyone dons one, whether traditional ivory-colored, hunter-green, or high-necked and fuchsia. The cabled patterns of the Irish fisherman’s sweater are reportedly symbolic. The foundation, the cable, represents the lifeline for the fisherman’s survival. A honeycomb pattern symbolizes the industry of the bee. Various patterns hearken back to the Book of Kells, and ancient Celtic drawings found on megalithic stones and burial sites.

A romantic idea exists that each Irish fishing family had its own pattern knitted into the jumper, or sweater, so should Fate turn against the fisherman, his body could be identified when it washed up upon the shore. Historians believe this notion to be purely fabricated for storytelling purposes. In John M. Synge’s “Riders to the Sea,” there is a reference to the knit on the jumper of the drowned fisherman, but a specific family design is not mentioned.

Regardless, the traditional cabled fisherman sweater has been worn by sailors in Ireland and the United Kingdom for generations. Crafted with natural, untreated wool, báinín the lanolin from the sheep was retained and provided a waterproof barrier between the wearer and the harsh elements of nature.

As early as the beginning of the twentieth-century, a group of economically industrious women realized the market for the Aran knit among the tourists and artists who began to visit their Aran Islands. Profit could be had for their skillful knitting. Thus, the Irish fisherman’s sweater became known as an Aran knit. The cabled pattern soon became quite popular and was even featured in Vogue fashion magazine in a 1950s spread.

Claddagh
The Claddagh is a ring traditionally given to a lover for an engagement or wedding, or as a symbol of affection. Originating in the fishing village of Claddagh, near the city of Galway, it was first produced during the reign of William and Mary in the late 1600s. The heart, hands, and crown of its distinctive design stand for love, friendship, and loyalty respectively, and the ring can be worn in different ways to indicate the relationship status of the wearer. A Claddagh worn on the right hand with the point of the heart facing down, toward the end of the finger indicates a single wearer, while turned around, it signifies romantic attachment. Worn on the ring finger of the left hand, the ring indicates engagement or marriage.

Celtic Cross
Popular legend holds that the Celtic Cross was introduced to Ireland by St. Patrick or St. Declan, in order to explain the importance of the cross to Irish pagans. In the early days of Christianity in Ireland, Celtic crosses were used as freestanding monuments. A number of huge high crosses were erected in the eighth century and probably followed earlier versions constructed from wood. These crosses were often decorated with ornate Celtic art and occasionally displayed inscriptions carved in runes. This tradition later evolved into a custom of using Celtic crosses as grave markers, a practice which became particularly fashionable in the 19th century. From this point onward, it also became a symbol of Celtic heritage and pride and is today a popular design

Rest in Peace Volunteers Celtic Cross
St. Brigid’s Cross
Made from rushes or occasionally from straw, St. Brigid’s Cross first appeared in the 17th century, but the legend of its origin is set in pagan times. Legend says that St. Brigid was called to the deathbed of a dying Celtic lord by some of his Christian servants in order to try converting him to Christianity before his death. When Brigid arrived, the man was too delirious to understand her, so she began weaving together rushes from the floor of his sickroom. When asked what she was doing, she explained that she was weaving a cross, and the lord’s delirium slowly gave way to questioning. Converted, he was baptized just before he died.

Later, it became tradition to weave St. Brigid’s Crosses on February 1st, the Feast Day of St. Brigid. These crosses were hung in Irish homes to ward off evil, particularly fires, and were therefore most common in kitchens.

The Harp
Played by Brian Boru, the last true and now legendary High King, who ruled all Ireland in the 8th & 9th centuries, the harp has been a symbol of Ireland ever since. In 1542, it was adopted as an official symbol. In 1922, the Republic of Ireland adopted a left-facing harp, based on the Trinity College Harp located in the library of Trinity College in Dublin as its official symbol. It appears on state documents and seals, along with the cover of every Irish passport. The medieval tradition of printing harps on Irish coins also continues into the present with the left-facing Trinity College Harp featuring on Irish printed Euro.
Shamrocks and Four-Leafed Clovers

While the two plants are commonly confused, the shamrock and the four-leafed clover have very different meanings. The first has three leaves and is a symbol of Ireland and the Christian Holy Trinity; the second is one of the best known good luck charms. While the three leaves of a shamrock are sometimes said to represent Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, the leaves of a four-leafed clover are said to represent faith, hope, love, and luck. Additionally, the shamrock is a specific kind of clover, the three-leafed old white clover, while four-leafed clovers can be found in any clover species. In fact, the shamrock’s name indicates its uniqueness among clover. It comes from the Gaelic seamróg, a diminutive of seamair, the name used to refer to all clover. However, in spite of shamrock referring to a specific species, four-leafed clovers, produced by mutation, are rarer. They only occur in 1 out of every 10,000 clovers, which must be why it’s considered so lucky to happen upon one.

17 Amazing Things To Do in March to celebrate the month of St. Patrick!

March 6th, 2016

17 Amazing Things To Do in March
to celebrate the month of St. Patrick!

1. #17DaysofMarch – @Croagh Patrick’s, features music, special events, toasts, and fantastic food, with a different theme and special each day. www.facebook.com/Croagh-Patricks-Pub

2. Irish Music Sundays every Sunday @Music Box Cleveland www.musicboxcle.com

3. March 8th – Kathleen Linn – Rebel Doctor (Film) – Never before shown in the US, the film celebrates the rebel Dr., commanding officer, medical pioneer and humanitarian. River’s Edge 3430 Rocky River Drive (next to St. Joe’s Academy). 7pm

4. March 11 – We Banjo 3 @ Logan’s Irish Pub www.LogansIrishPubFindlay.com

5. Pogues Tribute w Boys from the Co Hell @MusicBoxCLE

March 12:
6. #StMalachiChurchRun www.hermescleveland.com

7. LunaLaunch – #LyricsofIrishFreedom – Luna Team Shop is the new, year-round provider of amazing and fun gear for Cleveland Irish Cultural Festival. To celebrate the launch, Luna and surrounding shops are offering great specials from 11am to 3pm. Author John O’Brien, Jr. will be signing his new book, The Lyrics of Irish Freedom, the story behind the Irish songs of rebellion and freedom, with bagpipers, Irish Wolfhounds and more. Luna is at 113 Front Street, just 4 miles from the festival grounds. www.lunateamshop.com

A Hooley ~ @Luna Team Shop Mach 12th - author John O'Brien, Jr, Irish Wolfhounds, Bag Pipers and more

A Hooley ~ @Luna Team Shop Mach 12th – author John O’Brien, Jr, Irish Wolfhounds, Bag Pipers and more

8. Claddagh Ball @ West Side Irish American Club www.wsia-club.org

9. March 14TH – #LiveMoreLifeBeMoreIrish If you would like to volunteer to help “Make the Irish Fest Great Again” (Sorry Donald), the magnificent Cleveland Irish Cultural Festival Creative Team, charged with nurturing new ideas and making sure guests and volunteers alike have a blast, meet Monday March 14th, @PJ McIntyre’s (17119 Lorain Road at Kamm’s Corner, in their basement Party room) 6:15pm. Good food, good friends and exciting new things coming for 2016. We need your ideas, but most of all, we need YOU.

34th Annual Cleveland Irish Fest

34th Annual Cleveland Irish Fest

10. March 15th – If you want a say in making a better America, you have to have a seat at the table – PLEASE VOTE!

11. March 17th – Sober 17th – non-alcohol alternative Bash with James Kilbane, Mary Agnes Kennedy, Brady-Campbell School of Dance, St. Ignatius Circus Company: great food, fellowship and family fun. Ahern’s Banquet Center 726 Avon-Beldon Road. 5-8pm sober17th@gmail.com
12. THE High Holy Day! Many start with Mass at one of the local Irish parishes. The 149th Cleveland St. Patrick’s Day Parade kicks off at 1:04 pm: parties, pomp and great craic fill the day at pubs and clubs across the state.

Happy St. Pat's

Happy St. Pat’s

March 18th:
13. Win a trip to the Auld Sod! And support Historic St. Patrick’s Church on Bridge Avenue in Cleveland. Tickets are $5 ea or 3/$10 Kathy Pierce @ 216.49.9064.
14. Welcome Home – Irish artist Kathleen Dorsey show at 78th Street Studios (West 78th Street, Cleveland) – amazing paintings of Ireland. 5pm to 10 pm. She is in Room 105, but all the studios are open that night.

15. March 20th – Emmitt Cahill (Celtic Thunder) @ West Side Irish American Club www.wsia-club.org

16. March 29th – Speak Irish Cleveland new classes begin, every Tuesday, 6:15 to 8, all levels welcome. Jobrien@ianohio.com

17. March 30th – #CIFF – the Cleveland International Film Festival kicks off March 30th. 193 feature films and 213 short films fill Cleveland Tower City and surrounding theatres. Supporting the arts is part of our blood; check out CIFF at www.clevelandfilm.org

CIFF40_OhioIrish_300x100-C

See live music events & much more @ www.ianohio.com

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know;
www.twitter.com/jobjr
www.facebook.com/OhioIrishAmericanNews

www.linkedin.com/in/jobjr/

http://songsandstories.net/myblog/feed/

www.instagram.com/LiveMoreLife

A story from this month’s issue of the Ohio Irish American News

February 15th, 2016

Living with Lardie: For A Quarter
by Dick Lardie

Travel back with me if you will to a place where one quarter bought an entire afternoon of fun.

Was there any better time when we were young than Saturday afternoon? We would all trudge off to the local movie house for the best day a person could have. It started for me at about age 9 and went to about age 15.

The early years, 9 till about 12, were exciting and new. I was allowed to go with my friends alone and spend the whole day without adult supervision (Unless you count the teenage ushers as adults, and I never counted them).

Ten cents to get in, ten cents for popcorn and a nickel for candy were the best bargains around. The locations were endless. The Uptown, Doan, Yale, Jewel, Commodore, Ezella, Éclair, Fairmount, Granada, Madison, Euclid, Riverside, Detroit, Beachcliff, Hilliard Square, Homestead, Capital, Yorktown, Euclid, Lake , Shore, LaSalle. I won’t mention all the downtown houses because most of us did not go down there till we were older.

Off you went into the show. Always a double feature of mostly “B” movies, but it would include a cartoon; Bugs Bunny or Porky Pig, if you were lucky, maybe Tom and Jerry or Woody Woodpecker, but hopefully not Merrie Melodies.

This was before television and Saturday morning cartoons. I would always try to stay through the double feature and watch the cartoons a second time. After the cartoon came the News Reel.

It was seven or eight minutes of News with film. This was fascinating as we only had radio news. Actual moving pictures with the news. What a concept. I told my friend Tony that News with film would never catch on because people just wanted to hear the news, not watch it. They got the adults to come every Wednesday night by giving away dishes and glasses. These were presented with music and exciting voices by companies like Movie Tone News and March of Time. Most of the kids were not interested in the news reels. We were anxious for the serial to start.

These were continuing stories shown each week designed to make sure you went every week. At the end of the film our hero would be in a predicament that he or she could not survive. That meant you had to come back next week to see how they managed to get them out of hot water.

We all envied these heroes, Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers, Dick Tracy, Batman and Robin, Superman, Zorro, Captain Marvel, The Lone Ranger, The Phantom, Brenda Starr, Terry and the Pirates, The Green Hornet, Tarzan, The Shadow, Captain Midnight. This list is not complete but you get the idea; weekly thrills for a 10 year old to become the hero, as he lost himself in the film, sword fighting all the way home, slaying the villains and saving the pretty maiden. All of this for a quarter and the movie hadn’t started yet.

The actors and actresses were not the kind that won awards but they were our stars. Glen Ford, Dan Dureya, Jeff Chandler, Anne Baxter, Ester Williams, Boris Karloff, Gene Autry, Roy Rogers, Bela Lugosi, John Agar, Audey Murphy, John Carradine, Barbara Steele, Bruce Dern, Michael Rennie, Richard Carlson, Randolph Scott, Vincent Price, James Whitmore, and again the list goes on.

The memorable movies for me at that age were the beginning of science fiction and of course horror movies. Some of my scariest movies to walk home from were Invasion of the Body Snatchers, The Mole People, The Invisible Man, and The Werewolf.

Three movies stick out for me as the most memorable as a ten year old. The first was “War of the Worlds’ with Gene Barry and Ann Robinson. The robots from Mars could not be stopped. They tried guns, gasoline, electricity, water, bombs and rockets. Nothing worked until God intervened and killed them with our germs. Whew, that was close.

The second movie that scared me was the movie “Them”. We had all heard about the A bomb tests and radioactivity was a scary proposition. The movie was about some ant colony that got radiated and grew to enormous proportions. The colony hatched some new queens that flew off and settled in the sewers of Los Angeles. It featured Edmund Gwenn (Santa from miracle on 34th street) as a scientist who is trying to explain the problem of giant ants. It has an eerie sound when the ants are about to appear. It was almost as scary as the scream in “Psycho”. The army was called in and they finally saved us, but the movie ended with a warning about the atomic age. Large ants invaded my dreams for many years after that.

My final movie from that era was “The Day the Earth Stood Still”. Wow, a flying saucer lands on the ground in Washington and an alien exits the saucer saying he comes in peace. Of course we shoot him and a robot named Gort comes out of the ship shooting people and weapons with a ray from his head. The alien, played wonderfully by Michael Rennie, tries to save the earth from all our wars but is injured in another attack. The female hero, played by Patricia Neal, has to get the robot to save the hero and almost gets fried because she forgets the phrase she has to say to the robot.

Ohio_0216_36pages_page34

I am 74 years old and still know what to say to that robot if ever I run into him. “Gort, Klaatu Berada Nikto”. I will save the planet if called upon.

Getting older changed the movies, as we moved into Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds, and then all the teen movies, followed by the rock and roll era movies. After that came Blackboard jungle, James Dean, Marlon Brando etc. Television soon took us away and the movies closed one by one.

Some of the old movie houses are slowly being saved. Let’s take our grandkids to the renovated theatres and tell them how we used to spend our Saturdays. Then tell them it only cost a quarter.

Ohio_0216_36pages_page1

Speak Irish: A story from this month’s issue of the Ohio Irish American News

February 14th, 2016

SPEAK IRISH
By Bob Carney
carneyspeakirish@gmail.com

I scath a chéile a mhaireann na daoine – In each other’s shadow the people live

Conas atá sibh? In past lessons we have learned how to ask for things(our visit to the pub), how to ask and respond to how are you?, greet people, ask the time, and some polite phrases we can use with others. This month we’ll meet some new words and phrases we can use to interact with others; that is the purpose of any language. The first thing after greeting someone we have just met is to find out their name, and introduce ourselves.

Cén t-ainm atá ort? (kayn tan-um uh-taw ort) What is your name?
Is mise ….. (iss mishuh) I am ……
If you are asking someone else’s name in return, we would use the tone of our voice to show emphasis when speaking in English. In Irish we can change the last word in the phrase as well as using tonal inflection.
Cén t-ainm atá ortsa? (kayn tan-um uh-taw ort-suh)
Ar mhaith leat (air why lyat) Would you like
Ba mhaith liom (bah hwah lyum) I would like
Cad é sin ? (cahd ay shin) What’s that ?
Is …… é (iss …… ay) It’s a ……
Cá bhfuil (kah hwill) Where is
Cé as tú? (kay oss too) Where are you from?
Is as …… mé (iss oss …… may) I am from
Cá bhfuil tú i do chónaí? (kaw will too ih duh khoe-nee) Where do you live?
Tá mé i mo chónaí ( taw may ih muh khoe-nee) I live in
Tá sé anseo ( taw shay un-shuh ) It is here
Tá sé ansin ( taw shay un-shin) It is there
Níl sé anseo ( neel shay un-shuh ) It is not here
Vocabulary:
Stáit Aontaithe ( stoych ayn- tih huh ) United States
Eirinn (air-in ) Ireland
Meiriceá ( mair- ih kaw ) America
Sasana (soss-uh nuh) England
Albain (all-uh bin) Scotland
trá (traw) a beach
an trá (un traw) the beach
óstán (oess-tawn) a hotel
an t-óstán (un toess-tawn) the hotel
siopa (shoop-uh) a shop or store
an siopa (un shoop-uh) the store
fuinneog (fwin-ngog) window
nuachtán (noo ak-tan)
newspaper leabhar (lyore) book
an fear (un -far) the man
an bhean (un-van) the woman
múinteoir (moo-un-cheore) teacher
fiaclóir (fee -uh- klor) dentist
úll (ool) apple
bainne (bon yuh ) milk
briosca (bris-kuh) cookie
rothar (ruh-her ) bicycle
cóta (ko-tuh ) coat
sráid (tryed ) street
an sráid (un-tryed) the street
rud éigin (row de gan) something
ól (oel) drink
Examples:
Cá bhfuil an sráid? Where is the street?
Tá sé anseo It’s here
Ar mhaith leat rud éigin a ól? Would you like something to drink?
Ba mhaith (buh- wah) Yes
Níor mhaith (neer-wah) No
Ba mhaith liom uisce I would like water
Tá mé i mo chónaí i Meiriceá (taw may ih muh khoe-nee ih mair-ih-kaw) I live in America
Agus tusa? (ah-gus tuh-suh) And you?
Is as Béal Feirste mé (iss oss bell farshta may) I’m from Belfast

We can go back to past issues and use words we have learned to create many new phrases. I know you will be very surprised at how much Irish you have! Please feel free to e-mail me with any questions or things you would like to see covered in future Speak Irish columns.
Ohio_0216_36pages_page12
Use your “cúpla focal”, couple of words, of Irish as often as you can. Irish language is growing worldwide and is as important as our music, food, sports and all of our history that makes up our Irish-American heritage. Share it with pride!
Slán Go Foill

Ohio_0216_36pages_page1

“Got Irish History? Feed the Need”

February 13th, 2016

Need a read? Feed the Need …

The 2016 Lyrics of Irish Freedom: Notes of Turbulent Times Book Tour is about to begin, just in time for St. Patrick’s Day and the 100th Commemorations of the 1916 Easter Rising (Ireland’s American Revolution). Don’t Miss it.

Book Tour

‪#‎LyricsofIrishFreedom‬ ‪#‎LiveMoreLifeBeMoreIrish‬
Get your signed copy @ one of these to date scheduled book tour stops, or www.songsandstories.net

JOB_biosheet2 copy

Get yours at songsandstories.net; I’d be honored to sign it for you.
John

“Follow me where I go, what I do and who I know”:

#LiveMoreLifeBeMoreIrish
O’Bent Enterprises includes:

Ohio Irish American News
Cleveland Irish Cultural Festival
Songs & Stories, my author web and SM sites:

www.songsandstories.net
www.ianohio.com
www.clevelandirish.org
www.twitter.com/jobjr
www.twitter.com/365Irish
www.twitter.com/cleveland_irish
www.facebook.com/OhioIrishAmericanNews
www.facebook.com/Cleveland-Irish
www.linkedin.com/in/jobjr/

http://songsandstories.net/myblog/feed